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Andrena andrenoides (Cresson, 1878)
Panurgus andrenoides Cresson, 1878; Panurgus rufocinctus Ashmead, 1890; Andrena andrenoides form bicolor_homonym Robertson, 1898; Andrena (Parandrena) andrenoides var clarigastra Viereck, 1908, replacement name; Parandrena andrenoides (Cresson, 1878)

Life   Insecta   Hymenoptera   Apoidea   Andrenidae   Andrena
Subgenus: Parandrena

Andrena andrenoides FEM CFP comp
© Copyright Laurence Packer 2014 · 7
Andrena andrenoides FEM CFP comp

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Andrena andrenoides MALE CFP
© Copyright Laurence Packer 2014 · 7
Andrena andrenoides MALE CFP
Andrena andrenoides, F, back, South Dakota, Pennington County ---.. ZS PMax
© Copyright source/photographer · 5
Andrena andrenoides, F, back, South Dakota, Pennington County ---.. ZS PMax

Andrena andrenoides, F, side, South Dakota, Pennington County ---.. ZS PMax
© Copyright source/photographer · 5
Andrena andrenoides, F, side, South Dakota, Pennington County ---.. ZS PMax
Andrena andrenoides, figure52c
Mitchell, Bees of the Eastern United States, Vol. I, 1960 · 1
Andrena andrenoides, figure52c

Andrena andrenoides, figure55d
Mitchell, Bees of the Eastern United States, Vol. I, 1960 · 1
Andrena andrenoides, figure55d
Andrena andrenoides, 189775, female, hummeral ridge interrupted by suture along dorsoventral ridge
© USDA Bee Biology and Systematics Laboratory, Logan Utah · 1
Andrena andrenoides, 189775, female, hummeral ridge interrupted by suture along dorsoventral ridge

Andrena andrenoides, female, tergal color variability
© USDA Bee Biology and Systematics Laboratory, Logan Utah · 1
Andrena andrenoides, female, tergal color variability
Andrena andrenoides, male, face
© Rebekah Andrus Nelson · 1
Andrena andrenoides, male, face

Andrena andrenoides, female, face
© Rebekah Andrus Nelson · 1
Andrena andrenoides, female, face
Overview
Reprinted with permission of the American Entomological Society from: LaBerge, W. E., Ribble, D. W. 1972. A revision of the bees of the genus Andrena of the Western Hemisphere. Part V: Gonandrena, Geissandrena, Parandrena, Pelicandrena. Transactions of the American Entomological Society 98: 271-358.

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This colorful, widely distributed oligolege of willows (Salix spp.) can be distinguished from other species of Parandrena by the usually red terga of the female, the reflexed sixth sternum of the male not being bent forward laterally, the large male parocular yellow macula with sinuous posterior borders, the relatively high vertex and the relatively shiny propodeum. The other species of Parandrena are contrasted with andrenoides in the descriptions that follow and distinctive characters can be found in the diagnoses of the former.

FEMALE. MEASUREMENTS AND RATIOS. N = 20; length, 8-11 mm; wing length, M = 3.40 0.157 mm; FL/FW, M = 0.96 0.004; FOVL/ FOVW, M = 3.36 0.058.

INTEGUMENTAL COLOR. As considerable variation exists, darkest specimens are described first, then palest followed by intermediates. Black except as follows: Mandible with apical half rufescent; flagellar segments 2 or 3 to 10 dark red brown to red below; tegulae translucent, brown; wing membranes hyaline, moderately infumate, yellow, veins dark red to brownish-red; terga 1-4 with apical areas hyaline and colorless in apical third, rufescent basally; sterna 2-5 with apical areas hyaline, yellow; tibial spurs yellow; distitarsi rufescent. Palest specimens differ from the above as follows: terga entirely red except narrow hyaline rims of apical areas; sterna red except last two mottled and red; brownish-red tegula testaceous; wing veins red. Intermediates where only tergum 1 or terga 1 and 2 red or lateral thirds of terga red are more abundant than black forms.

STRUCTURE. Antennal scape length equals first four flagellar segments or slightly shorter; flagellar segment 1 as long as following two and one-half segments; segment 2 as long as 3, each shorter than 4 and broader than long; segments 4-6 quadrate, remaining segments longer than broad. Eyes each about three and three-fourths as long as broad, inner margins converging extremely slightly towards mandibles. Mandible short, extending beyond middle of labrum when closed by about one-sixth mandibular length, with inner subapical tooth and basal inferior lamella. Galea broad at base, pointed sharply from about middle or just beyond so that outer margin concave in anterior half; surface moderately shiny, extremely finely tessellate with scattered minute punctures. Labial palpus short, segment 1 only slightly curved, ratio about as 1.0:0.6:0.6:0.7. Maxillary palpus surpassing galea by at least last two segments when extended, segmental ratio about as 1.0:1.0:0.9:0.7:0.7:0.7. Labral process small, short, no more than twice as broad at base as long, with pointed tip often extremely slightly bulbous.

Clypeus relatively flat, gently rounded from side to side; apical free margin extremely short especially medially; with round punctures of irregular size separated by half to one puncture width except along moderately broad, impunctate, midline (this area slightly protuberant especially apically); surface shiny, fine reticular shagreening moderately dulling surface basally and laterally. Supraclypeal area with small, round, well-separated punctures and reticular shagreening dulling surface. Face above antennal fossae with prominent parallel rugulae extending to ocelli, interrugal spaces dulled by minute punctures and coarse reticular shagreening. Facial fovea broad, long, extending down to just below level of prostomial suture, above separated from lateral ocellus by about three-fourths an ocellar diameter. Vertex above lateral ocellus equal to half an ocellar diameter, dulled by fine dense tessellation and sparse punctures. Genal area moderately broad, in profile about one and one-third times eye width or slightly more, rounded posteriorly, punctures minute, surface dulled by coarse tessellation.

Pronotum with low dorsoventral ridge crossed by distinctly impressed oblique suture; surface dull, finely tessellate. Mesoscutum between parapsidal lines with punctures separated mostly by about two puncture widths, somewhat more crowded anteriorly, posteromedian area sparsely punctate or impunctate, surface dulled by coarse reticular shagreening, moderately shiny posteromedially where shagreening is usually more delicate. Scutellum shiny, with minute punctures peripherally and often along midline. Propodeum with dorsal enclosure densely and regularly tessellate, slightly granular at extreme base; dorsolateral and posterior surfaces slightly shiny, coarsely and regularly tessellate, punctures extremely minute; lateral surface similar but impunctate and tessellation slightly coarser. Mesepisternum dull, with minute obscure punctures (virtually impunctate) and fine, regular tessellation. Wing with pterostigma at least as broad as from inner margin prestigma to wing margin; vein 1st r-m meets marginal cell at a distance from pterostigma almost or as long as breadth of pterostigma at base of vein.

Metasomal tergum 1 with basal area punctures minute, separated by two or three puncture widths, apical area similar but punctures progressively smaller towards apex, surface shiny, unshagreened or delicately so. Terga 2-4 similar but punctures progressively smaller and sparser and delicate shagreening more evident on each tergum. Pygidial plate large, apex rounded, internal raised triangular area well-separated from margins and apex but connected to apex (or almost) by a narrow low ridge. Sterna with abundant minute piliferous punctures except sparsely punctate basal fourths and impunctate apical areas, shiny.

VESTITURE. Generally white and abundant, inner surfaces tarsi yellow. Clypeal hairs relatively short, erect. Propodeal corbicula complete, internal hairs absent. Terga 2-4 with long apical pale fasciae broadly interrupted medially on tergum 2 and usually narrowly interrupted on tergum 3; tergum 1 often with small lateral patches of white pubescence on apical area. Sterna 2-4 with distinct subapical fimbriae of short, white, almost decumbent, plumose hairs.

MALE. MEASUREMENTS AND RATIOS. N = 20; length, 8-10 mm; width, 1.5-2.5 mm; wing length, M = 3.09 0.150 mm; FL/FW, M = 0.95 0.006; FS1/FS2, M = 2.09 0.150.

INTEGUMENTAL COLOR. Black except as follows: Mandible with apical third to one-half rufescent, with small yellow basal macula; clypeus yellow except narrow apical margin and small spots below tentorial pits; parocular area yellow to a line extending sinuously from tentorial pits to eye margin at level of lower margins antennal fossae or slightly above; flagellar segments 2-11 yellow to red below; tegulae testaceous; wing membranes hyaline, veins red; terga 1-5 with apical areas hyaline (rufescent in basal half, colorless apically); sterna with hyaline apical areas; distitarsi rufescent; tibia! spurs yellow.

STRUCTURE. Antennae short, barely reaching scutellum in repose; scape length equals first two and one-half flagellar segments or slightly less; flagellar segment 1 equal to flagellar segments 2 plus 3 or slightly less, segment 2 slightly shorter than 3 and broader than long, segment 3 quadrate, remaining segments at least slightly longer than broad. Eyes each about three and one-fourth times as long as broad, inner margins converging slightly towards mandibles. Mandible as in female but longer, extending beyond midlabrum by about two-fifths mandibular length, lacking basal lamella. Galea as in female. Labial palpus as in female but ratio about as 1.0:0,8:0.8:0.9. Maxillary palpus as in female but ratio about as 1.0:1.0:0.8:0.8:0.7:0.8. Labral process small, triangular with rounded, slightly swollen apex or trapezoidal with shallow apical emargination. Clypeus relatively flat, slightly rounded side to side, with irregular-sized punctures separated chiefly by half to one puncture width but slightly sparser medially although longitudinal impunctate line usually absent, surface shiny to moderately so, reticularly shagreened especially posteriorly. Supraclypeal area, face above antennal fossae and vertex as in female. Genal area broad, in profile at least one and one-half times wider than eye, sculptured as in female but punctures more distinct.

Mesoscutum, scutellum and mesepisternum as in female but often mesoscutal shagreening denser and dulling surface except in small posteromedial area. Propodeum as in female but lateral surface same as posterior surface. Wing venation and tibial spurs as in female.

Metasomal terga and sterna as in female but sternal basal areas with small widely spaced punctures. Sternum 6 with broadly V-shaped apical emargination, lateral angles produced at right angles to surface, toothlike. Terminalia as figured (Figs. 41-45); note the following: gonocoxite with angle at base of apical process on lower surface; penis valves with dorsal and ventral lateral lamellae developed; sternum 7 weakly or not at all emarginate apically; sternum 8 short, apically entire and neck region broad with short, stout, spinelike hairs.

VESTITURE. Generally white and distributed as in female except as follows: lacking pollen-collecting hairs; tergal apical bands weak (often worn and absent), basal area hairs longer (especially on terga 1 and 2) and suberect; sterna 2-5 with distinct subapical fimbriae of one- or two-ranked, short, almost decumbent, plumose hairs.

Geographical VARIATION. Andrena andrenoides varies geographically in the female sex in color of the abdomen. Specimens from eastern Tennessee, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina are entirely black forms. Specimens from Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota and Michigan are about 40% black. Specimens from Iowa, Nebraska, Wyoming, Colorado and New Mexico are entirely red. Specimens from Texas are about 30% black and from Kansas about 25% black. The prairie specimens which exhibit a high percentage of red specimens also show a large percentage of various intermediate forms between the red and the black, even in areas such as Nebraska and Wyoming where the typical dark form does not seem to exist.

This complicated situation cannot be detailed here because of a lack of specimens or too few specimens from many parts of the range. A name, clarigastra, is available for the red-abdomened forms, but we do not recognize these as a subspecies, since there is no evident step in the east-west dine and the dine itself is not a simple one-directional affair as evidenced by the large number of dark specimens from Texas and Kansas. Andrena nigrae shows similar geographic variation in the color of the abdomen (Ribble, 1968).



Reprinted with permission from: Mitchell, T.B. 1960. Bees of the Eastern United States. North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station Technical Bulletin No. 141.


Described under the subspecific name: Andrena andrenoides andrenoides

FEMALE. Length 8 mm.; clypeus broadly convex, projecting nearly one-half below suborbital line, smooth and shining medially, becoming rather dull toward sides, finely punctate, punctures very sparse medially, becoming quite close at extreme sides; facial foveae rather narrow, occupying above only slightly more than half of space between eyes and ocelli, covered with pale ochraceous tomentum; space between margin of vertex and lateral ocelli equal to about half their diameter; cheeks slightly broader than eyes, rounded posteriorly, somewhat shining, punctures exceedingly minute and obscure beneath rather dense pubescence; malar space distinct but quite short; basal segment of flagellum subequal to 2nd and 3rd combined; process of labrum small, broadly subtriangular, much broader than long; pubescence of head, thorax and legs greyish-white; thoracic integument rather dull, finely tessellate, punctures of scutum very fine, shallow, well separated anteriorly, becoming rather sparse in center of disc, those on scutellum very minute, sparse and irregular, surface shining; pleura without evident punctures; dorsal area of propodeum rather narrow, oblique, triangle rugosostriate near center along base; propodeal corbicula rather well developed, with a quite distinct anterior fringe, whitish; trochanteral floccus well developed, long, dense and white; hind tibiae quite slender, apex only slightly broader than basitarsi, scopa quite dense, hairs rather short, simple, whitish anteriorly, becoming somewhat ochraceous toward base and along hind margin; front and middle basitarsi slightly narrower than their respective tibiae; wings with but two submarginal cells, 2nd receiving 1st and 2nd recurrent veins subequally distant from base and apex; abdominal terga smooth, somewhat shining, punctures exceedingly minute, well separated but not sparse, apical impressed area quite shallow, occupying medially about one-third length of disc, becoming rather narrowly yellowish-hyaline along rims, discal pubescence extremely short, thin and sparse, entirely pale, terga 2-4 with whitish apical fasciae, that on tergum 2 widely interrupted medially, tergum 5 with a brownish-ochraceous, apical fimbria.

MALE. Length 8 mm.; face with large and conspicuous yellow maculae between lateral margin of clypeus and lower end of eye; clypeus broad, slightly convex, projecting about one-third below suborbital line, yellow except for two small black spots and the blackish apical margin, shining, punctures very fine, rather close, becoming still closer at extreme sides; space between margin of vertex and lateral ocelli subequal to their diameter; cheeks much broader than eyes, rather flat, broadened below where there is a broadly rounded angle opposite lower third of eye, dull, punctures exceedingly obscure, hardly visible; malar space very short; basal segment of flagellum very slightly shorter than 2nd and 3rd combined, those beyond the 2nd pale testaceous below, fuscous above; process of labrum small, subtriangular, tip narrowly truncate, mandibles quite short, with a small, inner, subapical tooth, overlapping very slightly; pubescence of head, thorax and legs entirely whitish; thoracic integument dull, punctures of scutum very fine and shallow, rather close and obscure anteriorly, becoming sparse near center posteriorly, those on scutellum very minute, widely scattered and irregular, surface shining; pleura densely tessellate, without visible punctures; dorsal area of propodeum rather short, oblique, triangle densely tessellate; basitarsi slender and elongate, considerably narrower than their respective tibiae; 2nd submarginal cell receiving 2nd recurrent slightly nearer apex than 1st recurrent to base; abdominal terga rather smooth, somewhat shining, punctures exceedingly minute and obscure, hardly visible, apical impressed areas shallow, occupying medially about one-third length of discs, becoming narrowly but distinctly yellowish-hyaline along rims, discal pubescence very short and thin, entirely pale, apical fasciae not developed; lateral apical angles of sternum 6 somewhat reflexed but not recurved; apical portion of sternum 8 quite slender toward base, somewhat expanded toward the rather broadly truncate apex, very densely short pubescent beneath; penis valves slender apically, slightly broadened toward base, not excavated, gonocoxites gradually dilated apically to form elongate subtriangular lobes which are rather narrowly rounded apically, gonocoxal lobes rather strongly produced, quite narrowly rounded apically.

DISTRIBUTION. Minnesota, Michigan and southern Canada, south to North Carolina and Georgia; March to August.

FLOWER RECORDS. Amelanchier, Prunus, Salix and Viola. Robertson (1929) records this species on Antennaria, Crataegus, Erigenia, Heracleum, Sassafras and Stellaria.



Described under the subspecific name: Andrena andrenoides clarigastra


This form is characterized by the bright ferruginous abdomen of the female. The apical impressed areas are more yellowish-hyaline. Except for the somewhat more deeply and closely punctate clypeus, this answers in all other respects to the description of typical andrenoides. There seems to be no evident constant differences between the males of this form and typical andrenoides.

DISTRIBUTION. Minnesota, Illinois and Michigan; April to May.

Identification
Note from Sam Droege: A male of this species was found from South Carolina Sandhills that did not have the yellow maculation on the base of the mandible.

Names
Scientific source:

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Hosts · map
FamilyScientific name @ source (records)
Polycitoridae  Salix sp @ BBSL (4)
Rosaceae  Fragaria sp @ BBSL (1)

Rubus @ AMNH_BEE (1)
Salicaceae  Salix @ AMNH_BEE (3)
_  Withheld @ BBSL (84)

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Updated: 2017-12-12 20:37:26 gmt
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