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Hylaeus mesillae (Cockerell, 1896)
Prospis subtilis_homonym Cockerell, 1895; Prosopis mesillae Cockerell, 1896, replacement name; Prosopis pygmaea_homonym Cresson, 1869; Prosopis cressoni Cockerell, 1907, replacement name; Prosopis magniclavis Swenk and Cockerell, 1910; Prosopis pasadenae Cockerell, 1910; Prosopis telepora Lovell, 1911; Prosopis cressoni var magniclavis Swenk and Cockerell, 1910; Hylaeus laciniatus Cockerell and Sumner, 1931; Hylaeus repolitus Cockerell and Sumner, 1931; Hylaeus (Hylaeus) teleporus (Lovell, 1911); Hylaeus (Hylaeus) mesillae cressoni (Cockerell, 1907), valid subspecies

Life   Insecta   Hymenoptera   Apoidea   Colletidae   Hylaeus
Subgenus: Hylaeus

Hylaeus mesillae, -female, -back
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Hylaeus mesillae, -female, -back

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Hylaeus mesillae, -female, -face
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Hylaeus mesillae, -female, -face
Hylaeus mesillae, -female, -side
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Hylaeus mesillae, -female, -side

Hylaeus mesillae, -male, -back
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Hylaeus mesillae, -male, -back
Hylaeus mesillae, Mid-Atlantic Phenology
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Hylaeus mesillae, Mid-Atlantic Phenology

Hylaeus mesillae cressoni Cressons Masked Bee
© Copyright Hadel Go 2014-2015 · 9
Hylaeus mesillae cressoni Cressons Masked Bee
Hylaeus mesillae cressoni
© Copyright Hadel Go 2014 · 8
Hylaeus mesillae cressoni

Hylaeus mesillae cressoni
© Copyright Hadel Go 2014 · 8
Hylaeus mesillae cressoni
Hylaeus mesillae cressoni Cressons Masked Bee
© Copyright Hadel Go 2014-2015 · 8
Hylaeus mesillae cressoni Cressons Masked Bee

Hylaeus mesillae FEM mm .x f
© Copyright Laurence Packer 2014 · 7
Hylaeus mesillae FEM mm .x f
Hylaeus mesillae MALE CFP comp
© Copyright Laurence Packer 2014 · 7
Hylaeus mesillae MALE CFP comp

Hylaeus mesillae, figure13a
Mitchell, Bees of the Eastern United States, Vol. I, 1960 · 1
Hylaeus mesillae, figure13a
Hylaeus mesillae, figure14k
Mitchell, Bees of the Eastern United States, Vol. I, 1960 · 1
Hylaeus mesillae, figure14k

Hylaeus mesillae
Ron Hemberger · 1
Hylaeus mesillae
Hylaeus mesillae, female, head
© USDA Bee Biology and Systematics Laboratory, Logan Utah · 1
Hylaeus mesillae, female, head
Overview
Reprinted from: Snelling, R. 1970. STUDIES ON NORTH AMERICAN BEES OF THE GENUS HYLAEUS. 5. THE SUBGENERA HYLAEUS. S. STR. AND PARAPROSOPIS (HYMENOPTERA: COLLETIDAE) Contributions in Science, No. 180.

This species extends transcontinentally from southern Canada to northern Mexico. Over most of this range H. cressoni is a common species. The populations from eastern, northern and montane regions commonly have the clypeus and pronotal collars immaculate. Some individuals within these populations may also lack maculae on the pronotal lobes and the tegulae. Clinal variation occurs uniformly from east to west, from north to south and with decreasing elevation. This elinal variation is manifested in two concordant characters, an increase in the tone and extent of the pale maculae and a decrease in the size and density of metasomal punctation, so that populations at opposite poles of the eline are very different in appearance. Specimens from Turlock, California, for example have the face marks bright yellowish, the apical portion of the c1ypeus is strongly infused with reddish color and the pronotal lobes and collar and the tegulae are conspicuously maculate. The abdomen is smooth and shiny, with few or no distinct punctures. Such specimens contrast sharply with others from the New England area in which the maculae are dull yellowish-white, the c1ypeus is black and the thorax completely immaculate; such specimens may have the metasomal tergites with obvious fine scattered punctures. The same is true if one compares the Turlock specimens with samples from Revelstoke, British Columbia, or with others from Sonora Pass in the Sierra Nevada of California. In all cases the two extremes are connected, through the intervening portions of the range, by a series of specimens of intermediate character. These series of intermediates form, in their entirety, a well-defined cline for the characters noted.

Under these cricumstances continued recognition of H. pasadenae, described from Pasadena, California, as a subspecies of H. cresson;, a status accorded this form in the past, is untenable. This bee does not possess any of the characteristics of a definable subspecies and I agree with Metz in placing H. pasadenae in the synonymy of H. cressoni. The subsequent continued recognition of H. pasadenae as a subspecies of H. cressoni seems to be traceable to Cockerell's refusal to accept the synonymy published by Metz. However persistent such a refusal has been, there appears to be no published indication why Metz's proposal should not be adopted.

Lovell's H. teleporus was proposed for H. cressoni-like males in which the lateral face marks terminate acutely at the level of the lower margin of the antennal sockets. These males seem to occur sporadically within the populations of H. cressoll; in northern and montane areas. I have examined the terminalia of males of this form and find no distinctive characters which will serve to separate H. teleporus from H. cresson;. I believe that H. teleporus should be placed in the synonymy of H. cressoni until conclusive evidence for the specificity of this form can be advanced.

Cockerell and Sumner described H. repolitlls from a single female taken at Ogden, Utah. Dr. Rozen sent the type to me and I find nothing in any of its characters to justify separating this bee from H. cressoni. The nearly smooth basal zone of thc propodcum is exactly like that of many females of H. cressoni available to me which also show a strong reduction in the longitudinal rugulae of the basal zone. This characteristic cannot be correlated with other features nor is it geographically consistent.

Dr. Rozen has sent the type of H. laciniallls, and there is no doubt that this name, too, is a synonym of H. cressoni cressoni. Before I had the opportunity to study thc type, I was puzzled by the peculiar shape fa the seventh ventrite as figured by Cockerell and Sumner (1930: 10, fig. 2). With the type slide before me, it is clear that the apical lobes of this ventrite have been broken off. The poor preparation of the slide, on which everything is badly flattened and distorted, is also responsible for the seemingly expanded gonocoxites, as these were illustrated by Cockerell and Sumner.

Cockerell and Sumner cite the type as follows: "COLORADO-Boulder, May 24, 1913 (F. E. Lutz)." The labels on the specimens clearly read "Boulder, Colo., M. D. Ellis, May 24, 1913," and "Salix." Since the specimen and slides are in accord with the original description and figures, and the type is so marked in Cockerell's handwriting, I have no reason to doubt that this is the true type.


Identification
Reprinted with permission from: Mitchell, T.B. 1960 Bees of the Eastern United States. North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station Technical Bulletin No. 141.

FEMALE—Length 4 mm.; black; antennae piceous above, testaceous beneath; face marks yellow, triangular, terminated acutely on eye margin slightly above level of antennae; tuberdes yellow; tegulae piceous, with an anterior yellowish spot. wings subhyaline veins and stigma brownish; collar entirely black; basal two-thirds of outer face of front tibiae yellow, mid tibiae with a very small, basal, yellow spot, basal third of hind tibiae yellow, spurs pale yellow, legs otherwise dark; face rather narrow below; facial foveae deep and distinct, narrowly linear, separated from eye by a slightly wider space, only very slightly divergent from eye above; basal segment of flagellum about as long as broad, slightly shorter than pedicel, 2nd segment shorter, slightly broader than long; cheeks and eyes of about equal width in lateral view; front coxae not at all angulate; dorsal area of propodeum quite extensive, longer than metanotum, coarsely striate; punctures of face below antennae sparse and very shallow and obscure, very close and fine above antennae, becoming obscure on cheeks and vertex; deep and distinct on scutum and scutellum, interspaces about equal to diameter of punctures; pleura dull, densely tessellate, punctures very shallow, sparse and obscure; punctures of abdomen very minute, more distinct on shining basal segment, closer and more obscure on following segments.

MALE—Length 3.5-4.0 mm.; black; antennae brownish-piceous, scape blnck, maculated anteriorly; collar black; tegulae piceous; wings subhyaline, veins and stigma brownish; mandibles and labrum black; maculations orange- yellow as follows: anterior line on scape, entire face below antennae, face marks, continued above antennae as narrow rounded lobes separated from eye margin and partially surrounding antennal fossa, tubercles, front tibiae except posterior face, base and apex of mid tibiae, basal third and apical rim of hind tibiae, all the tarsi and spurs; face narrow and elongate; cheeks narrower than eyes in lateral view; basal segment of flagellum short, broader than long, following segments about as broad as long; thoracic punctures rather fine, but deep and distinct, interspaces on scutum and scutellum about equal to diameter of punctures, slightly more sparse on pleura; dorsal area of propodeum slightly longer than metanotum medially, coarsely rugoso-striate; abdominal punctures very fine, sparse medially on shining basal segment, closer but more obscure on following segments.

DISTRIBUTION—Southeastern Canada and the New England states, west to Minnesota, southward to Georgia; May to October.

FLOWER RECORDS—Being in flight throughout the warmer parts of the year, cressoni visits a wide range of plants, collections having been made on species of the following genera: Anethum, Apocynum, Castanea, Ceanothus, Crataegus, Daucus, Erigeron, Evonymus, Hydrangea, Melilotus, Pyracantha, Rhus, Rubus and Solidago. It has also been collected on the following crop plants: apple, celery, cowpea, dill, mustard and parsnip. Robertson (1929) has recorded it from the following plants: Amorpha, Aruncus, Aster, Blephilia, Boltonia, Cacalia, Cctpsella, Cardamine, Cerastium, Cicuta, Cornus, Crypt at cienia, Eryngium, Eulophus, Eupatorium, Euphorbia, FragarIa, Galeum, Geum, Heracleum, Krigia, Lepidium, Lyco pus, Malva, Osmorrhiza, Oxypohs, Part henium, Pastinaca, Polygonum, Polytaenia, Potentihla, Prunus, Pycnanthemum, Sahix, Sanicula, Sium, Taenidia, Thaspium, Vaherianehha, Veronica, Viburnum and Zizia. The clypeus in females of cressoni is subject to some variation in that it is maculated in some individuals, the central yellow blotch being quite conspicuous in some specimens, barely evident in others.

Mitchell (1960) - The clypeus in females of H. mesillae is subject to some variation in that it is maculated in some individuals, the central yellow blotch being quite conspicuous in some specimens, and barely evident in others.

Synonamous name : Hylaeus teleporus
FEMALE—Length 4.0-4.5 mm.; black; antennae piceous above, testaceous beneath; face marks yellow, narrow and elongate, not entirely filling area between clypeus and eyes, terminated acutely on eye margin slightly above level of antennae; tubercles yellow; tegulae brownish-fuscous, not maculated; wings subhyaline, veins and stigma brownishferruginous; collar entirely black; basal half of outer face of front tibiae yellow; mid tibiae with a very small basal yellow spot; spurs and basal third of hind tibiae yellow, legs otherwise dark; face narrowed below; facial foveae deep and distinct, linear, separated from eyes by about an equal space, very slightly divergent from eyes above; basal segment of flagellum about as long as broad, shorter than pedicel, 2nd and 3rd segments broader than long, the following with length and breadth subequal; cheeks slightly narrower than eyes in lateral view; front coxae simple; dorsal area of propodeum sloping, slightly longer than metanotum, rather coarsely striate; face below antennae tessellate, sparsely, shallowly and obscurely punctate, punctures deep, distinct and close above antennae, these shallow and obscure on cheeks and vertex; punctures deep, distinct, close and rather fine on scutum, those on scutellum more coarse and slightly more widely separated; pleura dull, punctures rather shallow and indistinct; 1st and 2nd segments of abdomen somewhat shining, deeply, distinctly, rather sparsely and minutely punctate, punctures on following segments becoming obscure.


MALE—Length 3.5-4.0 mm.; black, including mandibles, labrum and collar; antennae piceous above, ferruginous beneath; scape black, sometimes with a small yellow maculation anteriorly; tegulae brownish-ferruginous; wings subhyaline, veins and stigma brownishferruginous; entire face below antennae yellow; supraclypeal mark long, pointed between antennae; lateral face marks abruptly truncate at level of antennae, each with a short narrow extension bordering outer side of antennal fossa, widely removed from eye, rounded above, little if any clavate; tubercles yellow; front tibiae reddish-yellow, posterior face ferruginous; mid tibiae yellow; mid and hind basitarsi and spurs pale yellow, other tarsal segments more ferruginous; face narrowed below; cheeks slightly narrower than eyes in lateral view; face with a shining shallow depression on each side between upper extension of face marks and eyes; scape rather slender, diameter at apex only slightly greater than that of pedicel; 1st and 2nd segments of flagellum nearly twice as broad as long, 3rd and following segments with length and breadth about equal; front coxae simple; dorsal area of propodeum slightly longer than metanotum, rather coarsely reticulate, posterior face truncate, very finely rugoso-punctate, subcarinate laterally, lateral faces somewhat shining, closely and finely but shallowly and obscurely punctate; metanotum dull, closely, finely and obscurely punctate; punctures of scutum deep and distinct, fine and rather close, not crowded; those of scutellum slightly more coarse and sparse; pleural punctures rather coarse, well separated, surface between somewhat shining, obscurely tessellate; basal segment of abdomen distinctly and quite deeply punctate, punctures fine but not minute, rather close in general, those on following segments becoming minute and obscure.


DISTRIBUTION—The type locality is Southern Pines, North Carolina. Specimens have been identified also from New Jersey, Indiana, Michigan, Virginia and Ontario. It is in flight iii the South from April to August.

FLOWER RECORDS—Rubus and Salvia officinalis.


Names
Scientific source:

Supported by

Hosts · map
FamilyScientific name @ source (records)
Anacardiaceae  Rhus copallina @ UCMS_ENT (3)

Rhus ovata @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Schinus molle @ UCRC_ENT (3)

Schinus @ UCRC_ENT (2)
Apiaceae  Apium graveolens @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Carum @ UCRC_ENT (2)

Cicuta maculata @ UCRC_ENT (7)

Daucus carota @ UCRC_ENT (1); MLSB__N16- (13); AMNH_BEE (3); BBSL (1); UCMS_ENT (9)

Pastinaca sativa @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Pimpinella anisum @ UCRC_ENT (12)

Zizia aurea @ AMNH_BEE (21)

Zizia cordata @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Zizia @ AMNH_BEE (3)
Apocynaceae  Apocynum androsaemifolium @ AMNH_BEE (2)

Apocynum cannabinum @ AMNH_BEE (3)

Asclepias fascicularis @ UCRC_ENT (3)

Asclepias @ UCRC_ENT (4); UCMS_ENT (2)

Philibertia heterophylla @ UCRC_ENT (1)
Asclepiadaceae  Asclepias syriaca @ MLSB__N16- (1)
Asteraceae  ?Ericameria @ UCRC_ENT (1)

?Ericameria @ UCRC_ENT (1)

?Ericameria @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Achillea millefolium @ UCMS_ENT (1)

Achillea sp @ BBSL (4)

Antennaria @ AMNH_BEE (4)

Baccharis emoryi @ UCRC_ENT (15)

Baccharis glutinosa @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Baccharis gracilis @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Baccharis pilularis @ UCRC_ENT (1); AMNH_BEE (1)

Baccharis @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Chrysothamnus sp @ BBSL (3)

Chrysothamnus viscidiflorus @ BBSL (3); UCRC_ENT (1)

Conyza canadensis @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Coreopsis lanceolata @ MLSB__N16- (1)

Doellingeria umbellata @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Encelia farinosa @ UCRC_ENT (2)

Ericameria arborescens @ UCRC_ENT (3)

Ericameria nauseosa @ BBSL (7); UCRC_ENT (3)

Ericameria palmeri @ UCRC_ENT (2)

Erigeron philadelphicus @ AMNH_BEE (2); UCRC_ENT (1)

Erigeron ramosus @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Erigeron sp @ UCMS_ENT (1)

Eriophyllum multicaule @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Eupatorium altissimum @ BBSL (1)

Euthamia occidentalis @ UCRC_ENT (2)

Grindelia sp @ BBSL (1)

Grindelia squarrosa @ AMNH_BEE (3)

Gutierrezia californica @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Haplopappus @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Isocoma acradenia @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Lasthenia californica @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Lasthenia gracilis @ UCRC_ENT (2)

Lepidospartum squamatum @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Leucanthemum vulgare @ UCMS_ENT (1)

Pluchea odorata @ UCMS_ENT (1)

Pluchea sericea @ BBSL (1)

Pseudognaphalium thermale @ UCRC_ENT (2)

Senecio flaccidus @ AMNH_BEE (2)

Solidago californica @ AMNH_BEE (1)

Solidago canadensis @ UCRC_ENT (7)

Solidago gigantea @ AMNH_BEE (2)

Solidago rugosa @ UCMS_ENT (7); AMNH_BEE (1); UCRC_ENT (2)

Solidago sp @ BBSL (19)

Solidago speciosa @ AMNH_BEE (1)

Solidago velutina @ UCRC_ENT (4)

Solidago @ UCRC_ENT (14); AMNH_BEE (2); UCMS_ENT (4)

Sonchus arvensis @ UCMS_ENT (3)

Tetradymia canescens @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Tetradymia @ UCRC_ENT (1)
Boraginaceae  Borago officinalis @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Cryptantha angustifolia @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Eriodictyon crassifolium @ UCRC_ENT (2)

Eriodictyon @ AMNH_BEE (1)

Eucrypta chrysanthemifolia @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Heliotropium curassavicum @ AMNH_BEE (2)

Hydrophyllum virginianum @ AMNH_BEE (1)

Phacelia cicutaria @ UCRC_ENT (2)

Phacelia distans @ UCRC_ENT (14)

Phacelia dubia @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Phacelia ramosissima @ UCRC_ENT (2)
Brassicaceae  Alyssum @ UCRC_ENT (2)

Brassica nigra @ AMNH_BEE (1)

Brassica oleracea @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Brassica @ UCRC_ENT (2)

Lepidium montanum @ BBSL (3)

Lobularia maritima @ BBSL (1); UCRC_ENT (5)

Sisymbrium altissimum @ AMNH_BEE (1)

Sisymbrium irio @ UCRC_ENT (2)

Stanleya pinnata @ BBSL (3); UCRC_ENT (1)
Capparaceae  Cleome serrulata @ BBSL (1)

Cleome sp @ BBSL (1)

Wislizenia refracta @ AMNH_BEE (1)
Caprifoliaceae  Symphoricarpos occidentalis @ AMNH_BEE (3)
Caryophyllaceae  Cerastium velutinum @ UCRC_ENT (2)
Celastraceae  Maytenus boaria @ UCRC_ENT (2)
Cleomaceae  Cleome lutea @ UCRC_ENT (5)

Cleome serrulata @ UCRC_ENT (3)

Cleome @ AMNH_BEE (1)

Cleomella obtusifolia @ UCRC_ENT (2)
Convolvulaceae  Convolvulus arvensis @ UCMS_ENT (1)

Cuscuta gronovii @ AMNH_BEE (2)
Crassulaceae  Sedum sp @ BBSL (1)

Sedum @ UCRC_ENT (4)
Ericaceae  Arctostaphylos patula @ UCRC_ENT (2)

Arctostaphylos sp @ BBSL (1)

Vaccinium angustifolium @ AMNH_BEE (1)
Euphorbiaceae  Croton setigerus @ UCRC_ENT (3)

Euphorbia albomarginata @ UCRC_ENT (6)
Fabaceae  Astragalus douglasii @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Lupinus excubitus @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Medicago sativa @ BBSL (1)

Melilotus alba @ BBSL (1)

Melilotus albus @ UCRC_ENT (4)

Melilotus officinalis @ AMNH_BEE (9)

Prosopis @ UCRC_ENT (8)
Fagaceae  Castanea @ UCRC_ENT (3)
Frankeniaceae  Frankenia salina @ UCRC_ENT (2)
Hydrophyllaceae  Eriodictyon sp @ BBSL (8)

Phacelia heterophylla @ BBSL (2)

Phacelia sp @ BBSL (3)
Lamiaceae  Agastache foeniculum @ AMNH_BEE (1)

Agastache rupestris @ BBSL (5)

Mentha @ UCRC_ENT (8)

Monarda austromontana @ UCRC_ENT (2)

Monarda @ AMNH_BEE (1)

Monardella lanceolata @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Monardella linoides @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Nepeta sp @ BBSL (1)

Pycnanthemum tenuifolium @ UCRC_ENT (3)

Salvia leucantha @ BBSL (1)

Salvia stachyoides @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Salvia ulignosa @ BBSL (3)

Salvia victoria @ BBSL (1)

Trichostema lanceolatum @ UCRC_ENT (3)
Lauraceae  Persea americana @ UCRC_ENT (1)
Loasaceae  Mentzelia @ AMNH_BEE (1)
Malvaceae  Malacothamnus fasciculatus @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Malva neglecta @ AMNH_BEE (1)
Myrtaceae  Melaleuca styphelioides @ UCRC_ENT (1)
Papaveraceae  Eschscholzia caespitosa @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Eschscholzia californica @ UCRC_ENT (1)
Polemoniaceae  Eriastrum virgatum @ UCRC_ENT (1)
Polycitoridae  Salix sp @ BBSL (3)
Polygonaceae  Eriogonum elongatum @ UCRC_ENT (2)

Eriogonum fasciculatum @ UCRC_ENT (22)

Eriogonum gracile @ UCRC_ENT (2)

Eriogonum saxatile @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Eriogonum wrightii @ UCRC_ENT (25)

Eriogonum @ AMNH_BEE (1)

Polygonum lapathifolium @ UCRC_ENT (1)
Ranunculaceae  Clematis ligusticifolia @ AMNH_BEE (1); BBSL (1)

Ranunculus bulbosus @ UCRC_ENT (1)
Rhamnaceae  Ceanothus americanus @ AMNH_BEE (5); UCRC_ENT (7)

Ceanothus crassifolius @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Rhamnus californica @ UCRC_ENT (4)

Rhamnus crocea @ UCRC_ENT (3)

Rhamnus ilicifolia @ UCRC_ENT (5)
Rosaceae  Adenostoma fasciculatum @ AMNH_BEE (1); UCRC_ENT (1)

Aronia @ AMNH_BEE (1)

Potentilla arguta @ AMNH_BEE (2)

Potentilla canadensis @ AMNH_BEE (1)

Potentilla glandulosa @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Rosa @ UCRC_ENT (3)

Rubus argutus @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Rubus flagellaris @ AMNH_BEE (2)

Rubus laciniatus @ UCMS_ENT (1)

Rubus sp @ UCMS_ENT (1)

Rubus strigosus @ UCMS_ENT (1)

Spiraea alba @ AMNH_BEE (1)

Spiraea @ UCMS_ENT (1)
Salicaceae  Salix exigua @ UCRC_ENT (6); BBSL (1)

Salix gooddingii @ UCRC_ENT (6)

Salix laevigata @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Salix lasiolepis @ UCRC_ENT (9)

Salix @ UCRC_ENT (5)
Scrophulariaceae  Agalinis tenuifolia @ AMNH_BEE (2)

Penstemon grandiflorus @ BBSL (1)
Solanaceae  Datura innoxia @ UCRC_ENT (6)

Datura @ UCRC_ENT (2)
Tamaricaceae  Tamarix sp @ BBSL (1)

Tamarix @ AMNH_BEE (3)
Verbenaceae  Verbena urticifolia @ AMNH_BEE (1)
_  Bee @ LAR (1)

Sam @ PN- (4)

Withheld @ BBSL (898); BBSL__ZION (14)

cucurbit @ NLA (1)

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Updated: 2018-08-18 22:44:30 gmt
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