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Trachusa larreae (Cockerell, 1897)
Anthidium larreae Cockerell, 1897; Heteranthidium larreae (Cockerell, 1897); Anthidium larreae; Heteranthidium larreae

Life   Insecta   Hymenoptera   Apoidea   Megachilidae   Trachusa
Subgenus: Heteranthidium

Trachusa larreae, female, face
Smithsonian Institution, Entomology Department · 9
Trachusa larreae, female, face

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Trachusa larreae, female, side
Smithsonian Institution, Entomology Department · 9
Trachusa larreae, female, side
Trachusa larreae, female, top
Smithsonian Institution, Entomology Department · 9
Trachusa larreae, female, top

Trachusa larreae, female, wing
Smithsonian Institution, Entomology Department · 9
Trachusa larreae, female, wing
Trachusa larreae, Lynn and Gene Monroe, Granite Ridge Nature Institute
Lynn and Gene Monroe, Granite Ridge Nature Institute · 1
Trachusa larreae, Lynn and Gene Monroe, Granite Ridge Nature Institute

Trachusa larreae, Lynn and Gene Monroe, Granite Ridge Nature Institute
Lynn and Gene Monroe, Granite Ridge Nature Institute · 1
Trachusa larreae, Lynn and Gene Monroe, Granite Ridge Nature Institute
Trachusa larreae, female, T1, mtg
© Kimberly Huntzinger, 2007 · 1
Trachusa larreae, female, T1, mtg
Overview
Extracted from "THE POLLEN-COLLECTING BEES OF THE ANTHIDIINI OF CALIFORNIA (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae)" by GRIGARICK A., A. (1968).

Anthidium larreae Cockerell, 1897. Can. Ent., 29(8):220; 9, $. Holotype 9, Las Cruces, Messilla Valley, New Mexico. (USNM). California records.—IMPERIAL CO.: Coyote Wells, 1 o IV-12-38 (E. Van Duzee, CAS). Holtville, 8 mi. E, 1 $] 2 9, IV-8-63; 2 <$, 1 9, IV-19-62 (R. Westcott, UCD)'. Palo Verde, 3 mi. S, 2 6\ IV-9-63, Larrea divaricata (J. Powell, CIS). INYO CO.: Inyo Mts., 1 3,1 9, VI-1-37 (E. Van Dyke, CAS). Keeler-Darwin, 1 8, V-22-37 (E. Van Dyke, CAS). Little Lake, 1 9, VI-2-17 (C. Fox, CAS). Mazourka Canyon, 1 9, VII-2-53 (H. Nakakihara, UCR). KERN Co.: Mojave, 1 $, VI-1-17 (C. Fox, CAS); 5 mi. N, 6\ VI-2-57 (J. Lawrence, CIS). Los ANGELES CO.: Little Rock, 1 $, IV-7-55 (P. Opler, SS). Mojave Desert, Highway 138, 3 $,2 9, V-13-44, on Salvia Dorrii (P. Timberlake, UCR). RIVERSIDE CO.: Blythe, 18 mi. W, 1 9, IV-2-63 (M. Irwin, UCD); 2 $,2 9, IV-16-37, on Larrea divaricata (P. Timberlake, UCR). Chino Canyon, nr. Palm Springs, 1 $, IV-21-60, on Larrea divaricata (J. Powers, CIS). Cottonwood Springs, 1 5,1 9, IV-26-49 (J. Gillaspy, CIS). Hopkins Well, 1 9, IV-16-58, on Baileya (J. Powell, CIS); 9 S, 2 9, IV-29-52, on Larrea divaricata (P. Hurd, G. Marsh, J. Rozen, CIS). Palm Canyon, 1 $, IV-5-25 (P-Timberlake, UCR). Palm Springs, 1 $, 111-30-16 (C. Fox, CAS); 2 9, IV-9-32, on Larrea divaricata (P. Timberlake, UCR); 9 mi. NE, 1 $, IV-19-57, on Larrea divaricata (R-Snelling, M. Stage, SS); 6 mi. W, 2 9, V-6-46, on Larrea divaricata (P. Timberlake, UCR). Whitewater Canyon, 1 S> jV-26-36, on Larrea divaricata (P. Timberlake, UCR). SAN PERNARDINO CO.: Adelanto, 1 $, V-23-45 (A. Melander, t/CR)» Apple Valley, 2 $, 1 9, V—26-41, on Larrea divaricata (p. Timberlake, UCR). Kramer Hills, 1 9, IV-18-62, on tfachaeranthera tortifolia (P. Timberlake, UCR). Manix, 22 mi. N, 5 S, 1 9, IV-26-53, Larrea divaricata (P. Hurd, G. Marsh, R. Schuster, CIS). Morongo Valley, 2 3,1 9, V-26-41 (E. Van Dyke, CAS). Ord Mt, 1 9, IV-19-60, on Senecio Dougtasii (J. Powell, CIS). Victorville, 4 mi. SW, 1 6\ 3 9, V-4-39, on Larrea divaricata (P. Timberlake, UCR). Yermo, j 9, VI-7-41 (E. Van Dyke, CAS). SAN DlEGO Co.: Borrego, 13 ^, 6 9, V—1 to 2—52, on Larrea divaricata (P. Hurd, G. Marsh, J. Rozen, CIS). Coyote Creek, 1 6\ 111-26-59 (A. Grigarick, UCD). The color pattern of this bee is yellow maculations on black. The metasomal bands are nearly straight and uninterrupted except for a slight tendency to¬ward dorso-lateral emarginations. The concave ter-gum VI of the female, median emargination of the male tergum VII, and all yellow markings easily separate larreae from the other species in California. This desert species is collected in southern Cali¬fornia in the spring. It is most frequently found on creosote bush but has also been recorded on three species of Compositae and one Labiatae. Sixty males and 40 females have been examined. The nesting habits of H. larreae were observed by MacSwain (1946) in New Mexico. Several dozen nests were found in a bare mound of hand-packed reddish-brown silt He reported that individual bur¬rows were excavated which penetrated 10 to 16 cm to a cavity from which vasiform cells (10 mm by 6-7.5 mm) radiated as numerous fingers. The cells (fig. 229) were constructed of plant resin and soil. The larvae spun brown mammilate cocoons, overwintered, and transformed to adults the following spring. No parasites were recovered.

Names
Scientific source:

Supported by

Hosts · map
FamilyScientific name @ source (records)
Fabaceae  Cercidium sp @ BBSL (1)

Parkinsonia aculeata @ BBSL (1)

Prosopis juliflora @ AMNH_BEE (2)

Prosopis @ AMNH_BEE (1)
Hydrophyllaceae  Phacelia distans @ BBSL (1)

Phacelia palmeri @ BBSL (1)
Malvaceae  Sphaeralcea sp @ BBSL__KWC (1)
Polygonaceae  Eriogonum @ AMNH_BEE (3)
Verbenaceae  Verbena sp @ BBSL (1)
Zygophyllaceae  Larrea sp @ BBSL__KWC (14); BBSL (3)

Larrea tridentata @ BBSL (88); AMNH_BEE (13)

Larrea @ AMNH_BEE (20)
_  Withheld @ BBSL (434)

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Updated: 2017-03-28 20:19:09 gmt
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