Female, abdomen, sternal scopa - The scopa is usually longest in the apical half of each individual sternite and is often densest medially | Female, hind tibial scopa, hair color | Head, mandible, presence of a prominent mound at its base that is marbled in tan or cream colored broken bands amidst significant sections that are translucent or transparent | Sex, number of antennal segments | State or province where bee was collected

Check boxes for all that apply. If uncertain, skip character or select several states. Then click on any search button.
Navigate with above index or scroll bar.

Number scored for a state is in green.

1. State or province where bee was collected

10AZ    8CA    2NM    6NV    4UT   

2. Sex, number of antennal segments

5Female, 12    5Male, 13   

3. Head, mandible, presence of a prominent mound at its base that is marbled in tan or cream colored broken bands amidst significant sections that are translucent or transparent

4Absent - There may or may not be a slight bump, and it maybe a lighter brown or amber but it IS NOT significantly lighter than the rest of RIM of the eye    6Present - The cream areas are significantly lighter than the dark brown rim of the compound eye   

4. Female, abdomen, sternal scopa - The scopa is usually longest in the apical half of each individual sternite and is often densest medially

3Present and about equal in length on S1-2, but the hairs are medially shorter on S3 and much shorter on S4    2Present on S1-4, the hairs of which are about equal in length on these segments   

5. Female, hind tibial scopa, hair color

2Entirely light save for a small patch right behind the basitibial plate, this patch appearing a LIGHTER color than the integument of the basitibial plate itself    2Mostly light, but with a patch of dark hair directly behind the basitibial plate which is as dark as the integument of the basitibial plate    1With both light and dark hairs, the hairs lining the edge of the tibia from the basitibial plate to the apex of the tibia appearing darker than those lower on the outer face of the hind tibia