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Discover Life 10 kinds match:
Ancylandrena atoposoma  [popup] female
Ancylandrena atoposoma  [popup] male
Ancylandrena koebelei  [popup] female
Ancylandrena koebelei  [popup] male
Ancylandrena larreae  [popup] female
Ancylandrena larreae  [popup] male
Ancylandrena rozeni  [popup] female
Ancylandrena rozeni  [popup] male
Ancylandrena timberlakei  [popup] female
Ancylandrena timberlakei  [popup] male


REMAINING (number with state)
A. rozeni vs other species - The creator of this guide has not yet seen specimens of this species and used the description by Zavortink as a result
 Other species - Not as above (8)
 A. rozeni - This is a rare species with records restricted to Arizona, specifically known from the Tuscon area - The male appears closest to that of A. larreae though slightly smaller, has a shorter clypeus, has shorter antennae, has smaller light markings in the paraocular area, is less densely pitted anteriorly on the scutum, hairs sparser in the anterior of the scutum, and has a greater proportion of dark hair on the upper areas of the head - The female appears most similar to that of A. timberlakei, although it may be differentiated by the presence of some degree of a tan or yellowish brown mound on the base of the mandible, a greater proportion of dark hairs in the upper areas of the head, the fact that all hairs anterior to the middle of the tegulae are white, and that there is a greater proportion of light-colored hairs on the scopa (2)
Female, A. koebelei vs other species
 Other species - If there is ANY mound present at the base of the mandible, it is most often brownish and small enough that it takes up less than a fourth of the length of the mandible - The apical hair bands of T2-3 are only narrowly interrupted if at all, the rim almost entirely covered - The dense area of hairs at the middle of the rim of T5 is dark brown or black (3)
 A. koebelei - At the base of the mandible there is a nearly transparent whitish to off-white and somewhat bulbous mound, which usually takes up about a fourth of the total length of the mandible, and often the light coloration extends past the mound up to half the length of the mandible - The apical hair bands of T2-3 are widely interrupted such that the medial third to fourth of the rim lacks a hair band - The dense area of hairs at the middle of the rim of T5 is orangish (1)
Female, abdomen, sternal scopa - The scopa is usually longest in the apical half of each individual sternite and is often densest medially
 Present and about equal in length on S1-2, but the hairs are medially shorter on S3 and much shorter on S4 (3)
 Present on S1-4, the hairs of which are about equal in length on these segments (2)
Female, hind tibial scopa, hair color
 Entirely light save for a small patch right behind the basitibial plate, this patch appearing a LIGHTER color than the integument of the basitibial plate itself (2)
 Mostly light, but with a patch of dark hair directly behind the basitibial plate which is as dark as the integument of the basitibial plate (2)
 With both light and dark hairs, the hairs lining the edge of the tibia from the basitibial plate to the apex of the tibia appearing darker than those lower on the outer face of the hind tibia (1)
Head, antennae, F2, greatest length vs width
 About equal in length and width (4)
 Longer than wide (4)
 Wider than long (4)
Head, mandible, presence of a prominent mound at its base that is marbled in tan or cream colored broken bands amidst significant sections that are translucent or transparent
 Present - The cream areas are significantly lighter than the dark brown rim of the compound eye (6)
 Absent - There may or may not be a slight bump, and it maybe a lighter brown or amber but it IS NOT significantly lighter than the rest of RIM of the eye (4)
Male, A. atoposoma vs A. timberlakei
 A. atoposoma - The apical rim of the labrum is flat, running about straight across from one end to the other - The yellow marking in the paraocular area is usually widest at the middle and tapers at each end, if widest in the bottom half then it is only very slightly wider here in comparison to the average width of the top half - There are significant numbers of brownish or blackish hairs present posterior to the ocelli (1)
 A. timberlakei - The apical rim of the labrum is somewhat convex, smoothly and slightly rounded outward - The yellow marking in the paraocular area is usually widest in the bottom half such that it appears vaguely triangular, often broad enough at its base to almost reach the clypeus - The hairs posterior to the ocelli are all white or very nearly so (1)
Male, A. koebelei vs other species
 Other species - If there is ANY mound present at the base of the mandible, it is most often brownish and small enough that it takes up less than a fourth of the length of the mandible - The clypeus is dark brownish or black throughout - The hair length on the fore femur is about evenly long throughout, where present, and is often LONGEST on the rear face of the femur (3)
 A. koebelei - At the base of the mandible there is a nearly transparent whitish to off-white and somewhat bulbous mound, which usually takes up about a fourth of the total length of the mandible, and often the light coloration extends past the mound up to half the length of the mandible - The clypeus is largely whitish to yellowish along the rim, this color tapering back up towards the antennal fossae - The hair on the front edge of the fore femur is many times longer than the very short hairs found elsewhere on its surface (1)
Sex, number of antennal segments
 Female, 12 (5)
 Male, 13 (5)
State or province where bee was collected
 AZ (10)
 CA (8)
 NV (6)
 UT (4)
 NM (2)