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Discover Life 53 kinds match:
Anthophora abroniae  [popup]
Anthophora abrupta  [popup]
Anthophora affabilis  [popup]
Anthophora albata  [popup]
Anthophora arthuri  [popup]
Anthophora bomboides  [popup]
Anthophora californica  [popup]
Anthophora capistrata  [popup]
Anthophora centriformis  [popup]
Anthophora cockerelli  [popup]
Anthophora columbariae  [popup]
Anthophora coptognatha  [popup]
Anthophora crotchii  [popup]
Anthophora curta  [popup]
Anthophora dammersi  [popup]
Anthophora edwardsii  [popup]
Anthophora erythrothorax  [popup]
Anthophora estebana  [popup]
Anthophora exigua  [popup]
Anthophora fedorica  [popup]
Anthophora flavocincta  [popup]
Anthophora flexipes  [popup]
Anthophora forbesi  [popup]
Anthophora fulvicauda  [popup]
Anthophora hololeuca  [popup]
Anthophora lesquerellae  [popup]
Anthophora linsleyi  [popup]
Anthophora maculifrons  [popup]
Anthophora marginata  [popup]
Anthophora montana  [popup]
Anthophora mortuaria  [popup]
Anthophora neglecta  [popup]
Anthophora nigritula  [popup]
Anthophora occidentalis  [popup]
Anthophora pachyodonta  [popup]
Anthophora pacifica  [popup]
Anthophora peritomae  [popup]
Anthophora petrophila  [popup]
Anthophora phaceliae  [popup]
Anthophora phenax  [popup]
Anthophora platti  [popup]
Anthophora plumipes  [popup]
Anthophora porterae  [popup]
Anthophora rhodothorax  [popup]
Anthophora salazariae  [popup]
Anthophora signata  [popup]
Anthophora squammulosa  [popup]
Anthophora terminalis  [popup]
Anthophora urbana  [popup]
Anthophora ursina  [popup]
Anthophora vallorum  [popup]
Anthophora vannigera  [popup]
Anthophora walshii  [popup]


REMAINING (number with state)
A. albata vs A. exigua
 A. albata - The midtibial spur is spinose and comes to a straight, sharp point, not at all curved at the tip - This species is larger in direct comparison, usually averaging around 10mm in total body length (1)
 A. exigua - The midtibial spur is curved or slightly hooked at the end as is normal for the group, not coming to a straight, sharp point - This species is smaller in direct comparison, usually averaging around 7-8mm in total body length (1)
A. columbariae and A. salazariae vs A. petrophila
 A. columbariae and A. salazariae - There are NO light integumental markings on the supraclypeus (2)
 A. petrophila - The light integumental markings of the supraclypeus are ALMOST ALWAYS present in the form of a transverse bar that usually is several times wider transversely than it is longitudinally, although it is important to note that RARELY some specimens have been seen with very faded markings which may appear absent (1)
A. columbariae vs A. salazariae - These two species are very similar, verified reference material is very strongly encouraged in attempting to differentiate the two
 A. columbariae - The hairs of T5 are largely dark, giving the segment a darker overall appearance except at the very lateral edges of the tergite where some lighter hairs are usually present - The pitting of the clypeus where the integument is DARK is dense, almost never reaching one pit diameter in interpit distance (1)
 A. salazariae - The hairs of T5 are largely light, although the segment may still appear somewhat dark at certain angles due to the thinness and translucence of these light hairs - The pitting of the clypeus where the integument is DARK is sparser and more variable overall, with many interpit distances exceeding one pit diameter, although one should note that in some specimens the pitting is similar to A. columbariae (1)
A. coptognatha vs A. lesquerellae
 A. coptognatha - The hairs on the galea are gently curved to their tips such that they do not have clear angles where they bend into the tip - There is a slight unpitted, longitudinal line running down the clypeus medially which is sometimes invaded by a few scattered pits and can be somewhat hard to make out as a result - There is a more sparsely pitted area of the scutum to each side of the midline, which although still slightly dulled by microscopic lines still appears somewhat shiny - The compound eyes are USUALLY brownish (1)
 A. lesquerellae - The vast majority of the hairs on the galea are clearly bent just before the tip, forming clear angles - If with any form of unpitted midline running longitudinally on the clypeus, it is ALMOST ALWAYS limited to the upper third of the clypeus, with the pitting denser below - There are slightly less pitted areas present to each side of the midline - The compound eyes are USUALLY greenish to yellowish (1)
A. coptognatha vs A. neglecta
 A. coptognatha - The terga have very light, transparent rims that are at mostly very weakly tan in color, that lightness contrasting with the darker integument found basally on the terga, this often most evident on T3-4 - The galea is heavily tessellate and dulled near its apex, but its basal half or more is so weakly tesellate that it is often overlooked, appearing shiny and smooth with mirror-like reflections - This species is slightly smaller in direct comparison, averaging about 13-14mm in total body length (1)
 A. neglecta - The tergal rims are only very weakly transparent if at all, virtually always strongly brown and opaque - The galea is heavily tessellate and dulled at the apex, and although it is more shiny basally the tessellation is still evident and acts to limit how shiny the galea is there - This species is slightly larger in direct comparison, averaging about 13-15mm in total body length (1)
A. coptognatha vs A. pacifica
 A. coptognatha - The tergal apical rims are distinctly transparent such that they contrast with the brown basal integument, this most evident on T3-4 - There are very few, if any, dark hairs present on the face below the antennal fossae - Foretibia with primarily light hairs - This species is ALMOST ALWAYS smaller in direct comparison, averaging about 13-14mm in total body length (1)
 A. pacifica - The tergal apical rims are opaque brown, only slightly translucent if at all, not contrasting well with the basal integument - There are always distinct, dark hairs present in appreciable amounts below the antennal fossae - Foretibia with all dark hairs, if with any light hairs then they are usually in a small apical patch - This species is ALMOST ALWAYS larger in direct comparison, averaging about 15-17mm in total body length (1)
A. coptognatha vs A. porterae
 A. coptognatha - The rims of the abdominal terga are transparent, clear and lacking the brownish color seen in the rest of the segments - The clypeus is much less pronounced, in profile the distance from its farthest point to the eye is less than the maximum width of the eye - The clypeus is about evenly pitted throughout, without an unpitted medial line - This species is ALMOST ALWAYS smaller than A. porterae, averaging around 13-14mm in total body length (1)
 A. porterae - The rims of the abdominal terga are a more opaque brown, if lighter than the integument basal to the rims then only very slightly so - The clypeus is much more pronounced, in profile the distance from its farthest point to the eye being greater than the maximum width of the eye - There is usually a very weak unpitted line down the midline of the clypeus, poorly-defined by a slight lessening of pit density there -This species is ALMOST ALWAYS larger than A. coptognatha, averaging around 17-18mm in total body length (1)
A. coptognatha vs A. vannigera
 A. coptognatha - The labral rim is more narrow and elongate, giving it the shape of a half-oval rather than a half-circle, usually with a very distinct notch in the apex - The clypeus is slightly less pitted along its midline, usually giving it a weak but still distinct unpitted midline - The first flagellar segment of the antenna is about equal in length to the subsequent four and a half segments combined - The apical hair band of T2 is weaker in direct comparison, although it may have similarly strongly branched hairs that appear to lay nearly flat, these hairs are usually only limited to the sides (1)
 A. vannigera - The labral rim is broader and less elongate, making the outline of its rim about a half-circle, and usually the medial notch in the apex is slight if present - The clypeus is about evenly pitted along its midline, lacking an unpitted line - The first flagellar segment of the antenna is about equal in length to the subsequent four segments combined, or only very slightly longer - The apical hair band of T2 is stronger in direct comparison, the hairs there being heavily branched and somewhat appressed throughout most or all of the rim (1)
A. curta vs A. squammulosa - Note that these species are similar enough that they were at one point synonymized
 A. curta - The first submarginal cell of the forewing is bare of any hairs OR if there are a very small number of minute hairs they are ALWAYS either on the upper vein of the cell or close enough that they are easily missed - The fringe of long hairs along the posterior edge of the fore basitarsus is composed of white to off-white hairs almost entirely - FRESH specimens USUALLY appear whitish in their overall pubescence - This species has a more northern distribution, its range extending into Baja California Sur and across to the state of Chihuahua with VERY FEW records in the more northern parts of Sinaloa (1)
 A. squammulosa - The first submarginal cell of the forewing has a noticeable number of hairs present in the upper half, although sometimes these hairs are only near the vein but they are still spaced far enough from the vein that they are readily apparent - The fringe of long hairs along the posterior edge of the fore basitarsus is composed of primarily brownish hairs, although the tips may appear slightly faded and thus the hairs will appear lighter as a result - FRESH specimens USUALLY appear somewhat yellowish in their overall pubescence - This species has a more southern distribution, common in southern and central parts of Mexico, and it is generally never found north of the Mexican state of Jalisco although a VERY small number of specimens have been found in the southernmost reaches of Sinaloa (1)
A. erythrothorax vs A. curta and A. estebana - Make sure the hairs are not worn off your specimen
 A. curta and A. estebana - There is never an interruption in the light band of hair on T4 in A. curta but in A. estebana there may such an interruption, in which case there is USUALLY only a slight medial weakening of the band on T3 if any - On T5 there are noticeable amounts of pale, appressed hairs found lateral to the dark patch of hairs found medially at the rim AND these pale hairs are about as thick as those comprising the light hair bands of the prior segments - The pale hairs on the terga are white to off-white - These two species are both more common than A. erythrothorax in collections, with A. curta being the most common of the three (2)
 A. erythrothorax - The band of light hairs near the rim of T4 is usually interrupted completely at the middle and on T3 the band is usually weakened but still continuous - If there are ANY light, appressed hairs found laterally on T5 then they are much thinner than those in the apical bands of the prior segments such that the integument is hardly obscured, if at all - The pale hairs on the terga are yellowish - This species is rarer than the other two in collections (1)
A. erythrothorax vs A. peritomae
 A. erythrothorax - The hairs of T5 lateral to the apical dark patch are thin and simple, leaving much of the integument plainly visible below - The apical hair bands of T3-4 are usually very weakened medially, often with a clear break in the middle of the band of T4 - This species is usually slightly smaller in direct comparison, averaging 8-9mm in total body length (1)
 A. peritomae - The hairs of T5 lateral to the apical dark patch are branched and thicker in diameter as a result, strongly appressed and completely obscuring the integumental surface or nearly so - The hair bands of T3-4 are about equal in strength throughout, often even thicker medially although also sometimes VERY SLIGHTLY weakened - This species is usually slightly larger in direct comparison, averaging 9-10mm in length (1)
A. estebana vs A. peritomae
 A. estebana - The mandible is slender, not strongly broadened near the tip, and the subapical tooth is readily visible - USUALLY the light integumental markings on the clypeus reach no more than two-thirds of the way from the rim of the clypeus up to the supraclypeus, although a few specimens have been seen with the light markings reaching all the way to the base - The pygidial plate is broader, in direct comparison, appearing more rounded because the sides are somewhat convex (1)
 A. peritomae - The mandible is broadened and enlarged into a large scoop and although the tip still comes to a very slight point, as in most species, the subapical tooth is reduced such that it is little more than a slight bump along the outline of the mandible - USUALLY the light integumental markings on the clypeus make their all the way up to the base of the clypeus where they meets the supraclypeus, although some specimens have been seen where they only reach about three-fourths up - The pygidial plate is narrower, in direct comparison, appearing sharper because the sides are roughly straight (1)
A. exigua vs A. flavocincta - The width of the inferior tooth should be measured as the greatest distance between its outer margin and where it meets the main blade of the mandible, and the width of the main blade of the mandible should be measured at the same spot
 A. exigua - The inferior, smaller tooth of the mandible is more reduced, its greatest width clearly less than half that of the rest of the main blade of the mandible - The pitting in the yellow portion of the clypeus is more sparse, interpit distances regularly equal to several pit diameters - This species is smaller in direct comparison, usually averaging around 7-8mm in total body length (1)
 A. flavocincta - The inferior, smaller tooth of the mandible is more defined, its greatest width at least half that of the main blade of the mandible and usually greater than that - The pitting in the yellow portion of the clypeus is more dense, interpit distance usually only barely exceeding one pit diameter - This species is larger in direct comparison, usually averaging around 10mm in total body length (1)
A. exigua vs A. petrophila - This is a very difficult species pair to separate, reference material is strongly advised
 A. exigua - On S5 the longer hairs close to the apex appear dark when viewed from multiple angles due to the presence of intermixed brownish hairs - The thick, appressed light hairs on T5 are denser than in A. petrophila, in direct comparison (1)
 A. petrophila - On S5 the longer hairs near the apex appear pale when viewed from the front or side-front, although a small nested patch of brownish hairs right at the rim can often be seen when looking at the rim from the rear or side-rear, this patch is only visible from this viewpoint as it usually stretches across about one-half to two-thirds of the rim - There are usually few thick, appressed light hairs on T5, but, in direct comparison, they are they are less dense than in A. exigua, and sometimes there are none apparent (1)
A. flavocincta vs A. petrophila
 A. flavocincta - On T5, there are a significant number of appressed, light and branched hairs which effectively obscure most or all of the surface - The light integumental area along the rim of the clypeus is relatively densely pitted, if more sparsely pitted than the dark integumental areas then only very slightly so - The terga are more densely covered in hairs, obscuring them and making the abdomen appear lighter as a result - This species is almost always clearly larger in direct comparison, averaging about 9-10mm in total body length (1)
 A. petrophila - On T5, there are very few, if any, appressed, light and branched hairs to cover the surface, leaving the integument largely visible - The light integumental area along the rim of the clypeus appears much more sparsely pitted, at least in part, than the darker integumental areas - The hairs of the terga are more sparse, leaving the integument more visible beneath and giving the abdomen a slightly darker appearance overall - This is a smaller species in direct comparison, usually averaging about 6-8mm in total body length (1)
A. flexipes vs A. petrophila
 A. flexipes - The light markings on the supraclypeus are extensive usually reaching at least the lower level of the antennal bases - The apical half of the midtibial spur is abnormally straight and is missing the typical curve into the tip seen in most Heliophila, though often appearing somewhat wavy throughout its length - The teeth of the hind tibial spurs are black or dark brown, clearly contrasting with the spur itself - In direct comparison, this species is usually larger than A. petrophila (1)
 A. petrophila - The light markings on the supraclypeus are usually very restricted present just along the border with the clypeus and not extending up much farther - The midtibial spur is curved into its tip as is normally seen in Heliophila - The teeth of the hind tibial spurs are a tannish-brown color, about the same color as the spur itself - In direct comparison, this species is usually smaller than A. flexipes (1)
A. lesquerellae vs A. neglecta
 A. lesquerellae - Almost all the long hairs on the galea are strongly bent near their tips, directed toward the apex of the galea - There are almost never any dark hairs on the face below the antennal fossae (1)
 A. neglecta - The long hairs on the galea are mostly curved forward to the apex at their tips, although some minority may appear clearly bent they are obviously not dominant - There are always clear dark hairs present on the face below the antennal fossae, usually in the paraocular area (1)
A. lesquerellae vs A. platti
 A. lesquerellae - There are no black hairs present on the cheek, along the outer edge of the compound eye, and if there are any black hairs present on the face then they are few and limited to the area near the mandible base - The hairs of the scutum are white to slightly off-white, this most obvious without a microscope - The hairs of T4 are a thorough mix of dark and light - The hairs of T5 are variable but usually primarily light, if with extensive black then they are still intermixed (1)
 A. platti - There are very long, obvious black hairs present along the outer margins of the compound eye on the cheek and the face has extensive black hairs throughout - The hairs of the scutum are a yellowish to tan color, although they may appear off-white in some faded specimens - The hairs of T4 are almost entirely black, save for at the lateral sides where there is some white - The hairs of T5 are black medially with some white present to each side near the lateral edges of the tergite (1)
A. lesquerellae vs A. porterae
 A. lesquerellae - The hairs of the galea are distinctly BENT forward toward the apex of the galea at their tips - The clypeus is about evenly pitted throughout, without an unpitted medial line - The long hairs trailing back from the rear edge of the foretibia are almost all light - This species is ALMOST ALWAYS smaller than A. porterae, averaging around 13-14mm in total body length (1)
 A. porterae - The hairs of the galea are at most weakly curved near the tips, lacking distinct bends - There is usually a very weak unpitted line down the midline of the clypeus, poorly-defined by a slight lessening of pit density there - The long hairs trailing back from the rear edge of the foretibia are primarily dark to all dark - This species is ALMOST ALWAYS larger than A. lesquerellae, averaging around 17-18mm in total body length (1)
A. lesquerellae vs A. vannigera
 A. lesquerellae - The vast majority of the hairs on the galea are clearly bent just before the tip, forming clear angles - The compound eyes are USUALLY greenish to yellowish - The plumose hairs of T2 are always limited to the basal half of T2, usually only the basal third - In direct comparison, the labrum is much more narrow and the tip is about equal in shape to a half-circle (1)
 A. vannigera - The vast majority of the hairs on the galea are at most gently curved into the tip, although a very small minority may appear angularly bent just before the tips - The compound eyes are USUALLY brownish - The plumose hairs of T2 regularly extend to the midpoint of the segment, often surpassing it and making it into the apical half - In direct comparison, the labrum is much broader at the tip and only the entire outline of the labrum appears to near the form of a half-circle (1)
A. neglecta vs A. pacifica
 A. neglecta - The outer face of the midtibia is primarily covered in light hairs, with a slight darkened spot of hairs near the tip - The branched, appressed hairs on the foretibia are light in color and the upright hairs are variable in color - The galea is clearly tessellate throughout its length, like lizard skin, although in the basal half the tessellations may be slightly weaker and shiny the but still apparent - This species is usually smaller in direct comparison, averaging about 14-15mm in total body length (1)
 A. pacifica - The outer face of the midtibia is primarily covered in dark hairs, usually with a slightly lighter spot of hairs near the tip - The branched, appressed hairs on the foretibia are dark in color and the upright hairs are variable in color- The galea is strongly tessellate near the tip, but the basal half or more of the galeal length is far more weakly tessellate and shiny, with mirror-like reflections - This species is usually larger in direct comparison, averaging about 15-17mm in total body length (1)
A. neglecta vs A. platti
 A. neglecta - F1 of antennae about equal in length to the next 4.5 segments - T3 with many intermixed lighter hairs, although almost always dark hairs are still dominant - The black hairs on the scutum are only very slightly longer than the light hairs around them, making them stick out less than in A. platti - In direct comparison, this species is usually very slightly larger than A. platti, averaging about 14-15mm in total body length (1)
 A. platti - F1 of antennae about equal in length to the next 4 segments - T3 with few, if any, light hairs on the dorsal surface, and if there are any present then they are usually restricted to the middle - The black hairs on the scutum are usually clearly longer than the light hairs present, making them much more distinctive - In direct comparison, this species is usually very slightly smaller than A. neglecta, averaging about 13-14mm in total body length (1)
A. neglecta vs A. porterae
 A. neglecta - The tip of the midtibial spur is hooked, but only weakly so, only slightly more strongly bent at the end than the rest of the spur is curved throughout - The galea is clearly more smooth and shiny in the basal half, although still tessellate there are slight mirror-like reflections - ALWAYS with significant black hairs intermixed on the anterior half of the scutellum - VERY CONSISTENTLY smaller, averaging around 14-15mm - According the Cockerell, the eyes are black or dark gray (1)
 A. porterae - The midtibial spur is clearly hooked at the end, much more strongly bent at the tip than it is throughout the gradually and evenly curved rest of the spur - The galea is about evenly dulled by tessellation throughout, except sometimes very slightly more shiny in the basal half or so in that case the tessellation is still readily apparent except at the very base - Only UNCOMMONLY with any black hairs intermixed on the anterior half of the scutellum, although sometimes the hairs here are intermixed black and light to the extent seen in A. neglecta - VERY CONSISTENTLY larger, averaging around 17-18mm - According to Cockerell, the eyes are green (1)
A. neglecta vs A. ursina IN THE WEST - Note that this applies only to the western color form of A. ursina
 A. neglecta - The clypeus is less pronounced, in profile its distance from the compound eye to the front of the clypeus being less than the maximum width of the compound eye - The eyes are usually a dull, light brownish to gray color - There are usually extensive light hairs present on T3, especially at the rim, giving it a slight hair banded appearance BUT some questionably determined specimens have nearly all dark hairs (1)
 A. ursina - The clypeus is more pronounced, in profile the distance from the compound eye to the front of the clypeus being greater than the maximum width of the compound eye or at least even - The eyes are usually a greenish color - There are hardly ever extensive light hairs on T3, usually if with any then they are only at the basal middle BUT some questionably determined material has light hairs spread throughout (1)
A. neglecta vs A. vannigera
 A. neglecta - The surface of the scutum is equally dull throughout, regardless of pit density - The first flagellar segment of the antenna is about equal to the next four and a half segments - The galea is clearly tessellate throughout, although it appears more dull near the tip than at the base where it becomes slightly shiny (1)
 A. vannigera - The surface of the scutum is significantly more smooth and shiny near the middle where the pitting is more sparse - The first flagellar segment of the antenna is about equal in length to the subsequent four segments, sometimes very slightly longer than that combination - The galea is significantly more shiny and smooth near the base than at the tip, giving off mirror-like reflections basally (1)
A. pacifica vs A. platti - Note that this only applies to the light form of A. pacifica, not the easily-recognized form with entirely dark hairs
 A. pacifica - The first flagellar segment is about equal in length to the subsequent four and a half segments combined - The outer face of the midtibia is covered in primarily dark hairs, usually with a slightly lighter spot of hairs near the tip - The branched, appressed hairs on the foretibia are dark in color - There are almost always distinct light hairs along the apical rims of T3-4, although they do not often form strong distinct bands - Often with hints of metallic blue on the abdominal terga - This species is ALMOST ALWAYS larger in direct comparison, averaging about 15-17mm in total body length (1)
 A. platti - The first flagellar segment is about equal in length to the subsequent four segments combined, sometimes VERY SLIGHTLY longer - The outer face of the midtibia is covered in primarily light hairs, with a slight darkened spot of hairs near the tip - The branched, appressed hairs on the foretibia are light in color - There are virtually no light hairs present along the apical rims of T3-4, giving the abdomen a much darker appearance - Never with metallic blue hints on the abdominal terga - This species is ALMOST ALWAYS smaller in direct comparison, averaging about 13-14mm in total body length (1)
A. pacifica vs A. porterae
 A. pacifica - The highly-branched, appressed hairs near the end of the foretibia are dark, about the same color as the integument - The midtibia is covered almost entirely in darker hairs, often with a slightly lighter patch near the tip - The galea is strongly textured and dulled at the tip, but by about halfway up its total length it has become much more smooth and shiny, giving off mirror-like reflections - This species is usually slightly smaller in direct comparison (1)
 A. porterae - The highly-branched, appressed hairs near the end of the foretibia are light, clearly contrasting with the darker color of the integument - The midtibia is almost entirely covered in light hairs, with a distinctly darker patch near the tip - The galea is strongly textured and dulled at the tip and throughout much of its length, if shiny and giving off mirror-like reflections then only at the very base - This species is usually slightly larger in direct comparison (1)
A. pacifica vs A. ursina IN THE WEST - Note that this applies only to the western color form of A. ursina and the light color form of A. pacifica
 A. pacifica - The hairs on the outside of the foretibia are entirely dark or nearly so, usually with a light spot near the apex - The curled-over patch of hairs present on the end of the hindfemur is all dark or nearly so - There are always at least a few dark hairs present on T1 - This species is usually slightly larger, averaging 15-17mm in total body length (1)
 A. ursina - The appressed, heavily branched hairs on the outer face of the foretibia are usually primarily light, but often also with some dark hairs present - The curled-over patch of hairs present on the end of the hindfemur is primarily light, although beneath the light hairs there is often a small bit of darker hairs as well - No specimens of this species examined had dark hairs on T1 - This species is usually slightly smaller, averaging 14-15mm (1)
A. pacifica vs A. vannigera
 A. pacifica - The tergal apical rims are opaque brown, only slightly translucent if at all, not contrasting well with the basal integument - The outer face of the midtibia is covered in primarily dark hairs, usually with a slightly lighter spot of hairs near the tip - The branched, appressed hairs on the foretibia are dark in color - Often with hints of metallic blue on the abdominal terga - This species is ALMOST ALWAYS larger in direct comparison, averaging about 15-17mm in total body length (1)
 A. vannigera - The tergal apical rims are distinctly transparent such that they contrast with the brown basal integument, this most evident on T3-4 - The outer face of the midtibia is covered in primarily light hairs, with a slight darkened spot of hairs near the tip - The branched, appressed hairs on the foretibia are light in color - Never with metallic blue hints on the abdominal terga - This species is ALMOST ALWAYS smaller in direct comparison, averaging about 14mm in total body length (1)
A. platti vs A. porterae
 A. platti - The long hairs trailing back from the rear edge of the foretibia are almost all light - Lacking white hairs almost entirely on T3-4, with them present only at the far lateral sides - The hairs of the hindbasitarsus are almost always all white except for in the apical brush of darker hairs - This species is VIRTUALLY ALWAYS smaller than A. porterae, averaging around 13-14mm in total body length (1)
 A. porterae - The long hairs trailing back from the rear edge of the foretibia are primarily to all dark - With white hairs spread sparsely along the apical rims of T3-4 - The hairs of the hindbasitarsus are highly variable, ranging from all white to all black - This species is VIRTUALLY ALWAYS larger than A. platti, averaging around 17-18mm in total body length (1)
A. platti vs A. ursina IN THE WEST - Note that this applies only to the western color form of A. ursina
 A. platti - The midbitial spur is gently curved throughout its length, lacking a hooked tip - The top of the hindfemur is covered in long, whitish hairs - There are USUALLY only a few scattered black hairs on the scutellum, if any - There are considerably less light hairs on the dorsal face of T4-5, often without any except at the extreme sides (1)
 A. ursina - The midtibial spur is strongly hooked at the tip, with a clear angle that is much more defined than the gentle and gradual curve throughout the rest of the spur - The top of the hindfemur is covered in a mix of long white hairs and slightly longer dark hairs, often with dark hairs dominant - There is usually a relatively weak line of black hairs in the anterior half of the scutellum that runs transversely across most of the scutellum, although sometimes the line is weakened or absent medially - There are almost always an appreciable number of light hairs intermixed throughout T4-5 (1)
A. porterae vs A. ursina IN THE WEST - Note that this applies only to the western color form of A. ursina
 A. porterae - The galea is about evenly dulled by tessellation throughout, although in the basal half or so the tessellation may be slightly weaker there are not mirror-like reflections - When looking at this species without a microscope, there usually appear to be very weak apical hair bands present on T3-4 due to light hairs intermixed with the dark hairs of these terga, these light hairs usually most dense apically although they do not have bands as distinct as in other large Anthophora like A. forbesi - The dark hairs on the scutum are usually most dense in the anterior half, leaving only a handful of scattered dark hairs in the posterior half of the scutum - The majority of specimens of A. porterae have mostly dark hairs on the outer face of the hindbasitarsus, although there are some occasional specimens with more than half white hairs there - The tegula is usually somewhat reddened, making it appear to be a lighter, more translucent brown color at least along the edges, although some specimens have been seen with dark tegulae - This species is usually larger in direct comparison, averaging 16-18mm in total body length (1)
 A. ursina - There is evident tessellation throughout the galea, but in the basal half it becomes weaker such that slight mirror-like reflections are present - When looking at this species without a microscope, there are almost never hints of apical hair bands on T3-4 as if there are any light hairs present they are usually limited to the basal half of the middle of the terga there - The darks hairs on the scutum are roughly equally dense throughout - Light hairs on the hindbasitarsus are much more prevalent in this species, often with more than half the hairs there light although some specimens do have mostly dark hairs - The tegula is always a very dark brown, almost entirely opaque color - This species is usually slightly smaller, averaging 14-15mm (1)
A. porterae vs A. vannigera
 A. porterae - There is usually a very weak unpitted line down the midline of the clypeus, poorly-defined by a slight lessening of pit density there - The midtibial spur is slightly hooked at the end, its tip more bent than in the very gradually curved rest of the spur - The light hairs along the rim of T3 are only very weakly branched, usually not appearing to have an apical band on T2 as such - This species is VIRTUALLY ALWAYS larger than A. vannigera, averaging around 17-18mm in total body length (1)
 A. vannigera - Pit density on the clypeus is about even throughout, lacking hints of an unpitted midline - The midtibial spur is unhooked, about evenly curved throughout its entire length - The light hairs along the rim of T3 are more strongly branched and denser, usually giving T3 at least a weak apical hair band - This species is VIRTUALLY ALWAYS smaller than A. porterae, averaging around 14mm in total body length (1)
A. terminalis vs all others - Head, mandibles, number of teeth or lobes at the tip
 Other species - Two or one tips (50)
 A. terminalis - Three tips (1)
Abdomen, T1, hair color
 1. All light - Entirely light, usually whitish to yellowish but sometimes orangish (41)
 2. Primarily light - Mostly light, but with at least a few dark hairs which may sometimes be shorter than the light hairs and harder to see as a result (20)
 3. Mixed, roughly equal amounts of light and dark - With both light and dark hairs, hard to tell which is dominant (9)
 4. Dark hairs dominant - With dark hairs dominant but some light hairs still present, or with ONLY dark hairs (4)
Abdomen, T2, color of hair - Be careful of worn specimens with hair rubbed off or specimens in which some hairs are MUCH SHORTER than others
 2. Primarily light - Mostly light, although some darker hairs are also present (27)
 1. All light - Whitish to yellowish or rarely somewhat orangish (20)
 4. Primarily dark - Mostly dark, although some lighter hairs are also present (20)
 3. Mixed, light and dark about even - A thorough mix of light and dark hairs, hard to tell which is dominant (18)
 5. All dark - All dark, brown or black (7)
Abdomen, T4, color of hair ON THE DORSAL FACE - Be careful of worn specimens with hair rubbed off or specimens in which some hairs are MUCH SHORTER than others
 3. Mixed, light and dark about even - A thorough mix of light and dark hairs, hard to tell which is dominant (20)
 4. Primarily dark - Mostly dark, although some lighter hairs are also present (20)
 2. Primarily light - Mostly light, although some darker hairs are also present (18)
 1. All light - Whitish to yellowish or rarely somewhat orangish (17)
 5. All dark - All dark, brown or black (9)
Abdomen, T5, color of the hair in the anal fimbria - Note that the anal fimbria is the very dense patch of highly branched hairs present at the middle of the rim of T5
 2. Dark - The hair color is darker, clearly brown to black in color (41)
 1. Light - Ranging from off-white or yellowish to a bright orangish color (18)
Abdomen, T5, hair color of the hairs OUTSIDE OF the anal fimbria - This character references the hairs of T5 except for those that are branched and very dense at the middle of the apical rim - If there are even numbers of both light and dark hairs then score both mixed states
 2. Mixed, BUT light hairs still dominant - The hairs of the middle of T5 are all black, reaching from the anal fimbria to the base of T5 (29)
 1. All light - T5 is covered in all light hairs, if with any dark hairs basal to the anal fimbria then also with a patch of only light hairs between those black hairs and the base of T5 (25)
 3. Mixed, BUT primarily dark - There are more dark hairs than light hairs, usually with the light hairs limited to the far lateral sides (25)
 4. All dark - All hairs outside of the anal fimbria are dark (7)
Abdomen, terga, presences of distinct light apical hair bands - T2 is the best segment to use for this
 1. Present - With a light apical hair band that stands in contrast to the color of the hairs in the basal region or hairs in the basal region much less dense, note that sometimes the bands may be weak and appear partially interrupted (23)
 4. Truly absent - The hairs on the apical rim of the segment appear to be the same color and density as the basal region or the dark and light hairs are thoroughly scattered throughout the segment and no clear light hair band is apparent along the rim distribution (20)
 2. Absent but appears present - The hairs along the apex are of about the same color and density of those at the base, BUT it appears to have bands nonetheless due to the integument of the apical rim being TRANSPARENT (18)
 3. Absent, band formed by integument rather than hairs - There is a white band formed on the integument itself, rather than by hair color, the hair color and density is uniform throughout the segment (3)
Body length in mm, when measured from tip of abdomen to front of head
 14 (29)
 13 (28)
 15 (27)
 12 (26)
 16 (25)
 17 (21)
 10 (20)
 11 (20)
 9 (20)
 8 (19)
 7 (17)
 18 (15)
 19 (9)
 6 (8)
 20 (3)
 5 (3)
Head, antennae, integumental color of scape
 1. All dark, brown to black (46)
 2. With a yellow mark which takes up less than half the length of the scape (2)
 3. With extensive yellow which takes up more than half the length of the scape (2)
Head, antennae, length of the 1st flagellar segment, F1 - Note that this is measured along the longest side of thesegment
 2. Moderate - About equal to F2-4 or greater, but not as long as F2-5 (37)
 1. Short - Ranging from approximately equal to F2-3 to nearly equal to F2-4 (15)
 3. Long - About equal to F2-5 or greater (15)
Head, clypeus, form of hairs - DO NOT USE if you believe many clypeal hairs may have been worn off your specimen
 Hairs normal, ranging from straight to evenly curved through their length (48)
 Hairs hooked, with very distinctive, abrupt bends in the apical half of their length, these bends often about equal to or approaching ninety-degree angles (5)
Head, clypeus, integumental luster
 Dulled by microscopically fine lines, shagreening, or other sculpturing, although SOMETIMES the rim or just the unpitted line is unmarked or slightly shiny (35)
 Entirely smooth and shiny or nearly so, usually giving off mirror-like reflections (34)
Head, clypeus, light integumental markings
 1. Clypeus all dark, brownish to black (30)
 2. With a strip of yellow along the rim of the clypeus, often with a slight medial point which is directed a variable distance toward the top of the clypeus but DOES NOT extend all the way, at most this strip of yellow comes to a fifth of the length of the clypeus from the top (16)
 3. Clypeus nearly entirely light-colored, although there are dark spots near the top which extend from the tentorial pits slightly into the clypeus such that the light integumental markings appear something like an inverted T, the base of which reaches the rim of the clypeus (15)
 4. Clypeus entirely light-colored, sometimes with a hint of black at the tentorial pits which DOES NOT intrude further into the clypeus (1)
Head, face, color of the hair found below the antennal fossae
 1. Pale - White to off-white or sometimes yellowish (37)
 2. Mixed, pale dominant - Darker brownish or black hairs are mixed in with the common pale hairs, BUT the light hairs are still dominant or about equal in density to the dark hairs (15)
 3. Mixed, dark dominant - Darker brownish or black hairs dominant, with CLEARLY LESS light hair than dark hair (8)
 4. Dark - All dark, blackish hairs (3)
Head, mandible, integumental color
 All dark, brown to black, although sometimes the TIP of the mandible may have a golden smear on it (32)
 With at least some degree of yellow coloration basally, not including the common gold coloration that may be found near the apex of the mandible (21)
Head, paraocular area, presence and extent of integumental light markings
 1. All BLACK - With no light integumental markings (47)
 2. YELLOW present - Usually just a small dot but sometimes extending along the outside of the clypeus up above its intersection with the supraclypeus (4)
Head, supraclypeus, light integumental markings
 Absent - There are no light integumental markings present on the supraclypeus (43)
 Present, entire or nearly so - Taking the form of a wide bar which covers nearly the entire supraclypeus at least in terms of width (10)
 Present, Partial - Taking the form of a weak or obscure dot or patch which is limited usually apicomedially (7)
Head, vertex, hair color - Be sure to check the areas all the way behind and to the sides of the ocelli BUT not counting the areas lateral past the tops of the compound eyes
 3. Mixed, with obvious black hairs throughout - Mixture of light and dark hairs present, usually with pale hairs still dominant BUT the black hairs are at least present medially (36)
 2. Mixed, pale clearly dominant - The darker hairs of the vertex are limited to the area above the gap between the lateral ocelli and the top of the compound eyes, the rest light such that there are no dark hairs medially (17)
 1. Pale - All light, whitish to yellowish and sometimes rarely orangish or light brown (16)
 4. Mixed, dark dominant or entire - Hairs are primarily or entirely dark (6)
Hind leg, basitarsus, hair color of the dense brush of apical hairs found at the end of the upper edge of the basitarsus - View from multiple angles as in some smaller species the hairs of the basitarsal brush are angled and reflected light can make parts of dark hairs look lighter
 Dark - Brownish to blackish (49)
 Light - Whitish to yellowish or sometimes orangish or very light brown (15)
Hind leg, basitarsus, hair color on the OUTER face, not including the hairs comprising the apical hair brush
 1. All white - Entirely white or nearly so, if with any dark hairs then it is only a very small number found immediately basal to the apical brush of hairs and they are usually suberect as a result, appearing intermediate in angle to the erect hairs of the rest of the leg and the flattened hairs of the brush (40)
 2. Less than half dark - An appreciable number of dark hairs are present basal of the apical brush of the basitarsus, but still less than half of its total length has these dark hairs (19)
 3. About half dark - With dark hairs taking up about the apical half of the basitarsus (11)
 4. Majority dark - With dark hairs taking up the majority of the segment, white hairs often limited only to the base of the basitarsus if at all present (9)
Hind leg, scopal hair color - Note that if there is a slight darkening just after the basitibial plate but the scopa is still almost entirely light then it should be scored as light
 White to off-white, sometimes yellowish and RARELY strongly so (48)
 Dark brown to black (7)
Melea vs other subgenera - Hind leg, basitarsus, presence or absence of a rear-directed integumental spine at the end farthest from the tibia
 Absent - There is no distinct integumental spike present at the tip of the basitarsus (50)
 Present - The spine will be distinct despite hair in the area, and it should be coming off the top corner of the tip of the basitarsus when the leg itself is pointed back (3)
Midleg, tibia, hair color on the OUTER FACE when NOT including the sometimes dark anterior and posterior fringes of hair that arise off the front and back of the tibia but are visible from the side - Be sure to score multiple states if you are not sure
 2. Primarily light, light brown apex - Primarily pale, white to off-white, but with a very light orangish to tan light brown spot near the apex which takes up well under half the length of the tibia (27)
 1. All light - Entirely pale, white to yellowish, lacking ANY form of darkening at the tip (26)
 3. Primarily light, distinct dark spot - There is a clear dark spot near the apex of the tibia which takes up less than half the tibial length (16)
 4. Mixed - There are a significant number of darker hairs which reach from near the apex AT LEAST up to the midpoint of the tibia BUT there are still appreciable numbers of light hairs present (8)
 5. All dark or nearly so - Entirely dark or very nearly so, DARK brownish or black, although sometimes with fewer than one-fifth light hairs present (8)
Species not scored for this guide yet, LIKELY SYNONYMS - Do not score this character if you wish to include all species
 RECOMMENDED - Remove these species from the guide (51)
 Display species not scored (2)
State or province where bee was collected
 AZ (43)
 CA (42)
 Baja California (37)
 NV (35)
 NM (31)
 Sonora (29)
 UT (27)
 CO (23)
 TX (22)
 Chihuahua (17)
 WY (17)
 ID (16)
 OR (15)
 WA (14)
 Coahuila (12)
 OK (10)
 British Columbia (9)
 KS (9)
 MT (8)
 SD (8)
 Baja California Sur (6)
 DC (6)
 DE (6)
 Durango (6)
 MD (6)
 ND (6)
 NJ (6)
 Nuevo Leon (6)
 PA (6)
 VA (6)
 WV (6)
 Aguascalientes (5)
 IL (5)
 IN (5)
 Jalisco (5)
 KY (5)
 MA (5)
 MI (5)
 NE (5)
 NY (5)
 OH (5)
 RI (5)
 Sinaloa (5)
 Tamaulipas (5)
 WI (5)
 Zacatecas (5)
 Alberta (4)
 CT (4)
 GA (4)
 Guanajuato (4)
 Guerrero (4)
 LA (4)
 Manitoba (4)
 Mexico, the state in Mexico (4)
 Michoacan (4)
 Morelos (4)
 NC (4)
 Nayarit (4)
 Puebla (4)
 Queretaro (4)
 SC (4)
 San Luis Potosi (4)
 Saskatchewan (4)
 TN (4)
 VT (4)
 AL (3)
 Chiapas (3)
 Colima (3)
 FL (3)
 Hidalgo (3)
 ME (3)
 MN (3)
 MS (3)
 NH (3)
 New Brunswick (3)
 Oaxaca (3)
 Ontario (3)
 Quebec (3)
 Tabasco (3)
 Tlaxcala (3)
 Veracruz (3)
 AK (2)
 AR (2)
 IA (2)
 MO (2)
 Northwest Territories (2)
 Nova Scotia (2)
 Yukon Territories (2)
 Quintana Roo (1)
Subgenus
 Heliophila (22)
 Lophanthophora (8)
 Anthophoroides (6)
 Pyganthophora (6)
 Mystacanthophora (4)
 Melea (3)
 Paramegilla (2)
 Anthophora (1)
 Clisodon (1)
Subgenus Heliophila vs other subgenera - Forewing, first submarginal cell, presence or absence of short hairs
 2. Other subgenera - Present - Usually over five hairs present in the middle or upper half of the cell (32)
 1. Heliophila - Absent - If with ANY hairs then they are extremely minute and limited to the very upper edge of the cell such that they are often hard to distinguish from the vein (19)
Thorax, mesepisternum, hair color
 1. All light - All hairs are white to off-white or yellowish to sometimes orangish (43)
 2. Mixed, primarily light - With primarily light hairs, but a VERY SMALL number of darker hairs are present near the top of the mesepisternum that are usually easily overlooked (17)
 3. Mixed, dark at the top - With both light and dark hairs present in appreciable numbers, but the dark hairs are limited to the top half (6)
 4. Mixed, dark at the bottom - With both light and dark hairs present in appreciable numbers, the dark hairs restricted ventrally and the light hairs on top (6)
 5. All dark - All hairs are brownish or black (2)
Thorax, scutum, hair color
 4. Mixed - A mixture of light and dark hairs, with the presence of both colors readily apparent throughout, although light hairs are usually still dominant (32)
 3. Mixed, light hair dominant - Primarily light, whitish or yellowish, but with some small number of darker hairs which may be easily overlooked if not careful, these limited dark hairs often ONLY found medially so the rims of the scutum appear only lightly haired (19)
 1. All light - Whitish to yellowish (17)
 2. Orange to light brown - Orangish to light brown (8)
 5. All dark - All dark or nearly so, brownish or black, only a very few light hairs present if any (3)
Thorax, scutum, integumental luster - Use conservatively
 2. Only weakly dulled, with at most microscopic lines (27)
 3. Smooth and shiny, without even microscopic lines obscuring the reflectivity of the surface (26)
 1. Dulled by shagreening or surface sculpturing, with little to no reflections, often resembling sandpaper or sometimes even appearing rather craggy (25)
Thorax, tegula, integumental color - Ignore hair color
 Light - Yellow or orangish to light brown, appearing nearly or entirely transparent such that the wing base below is readily evident (32)
 Dark - Brownish to brick-reddish, most often opaque and hard to see the wing base below as a result (30)