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Discover Life 24 kinds match:
Ceratina acantha  [popup] female
Ceratina apacheorum  [popup] female
Ceratina arizonensis  [popup] female
Ceratina calcarata  [popup] female
Ceratina cobaltina  [popup] female
Ceratina cockerelli  [popup] female
Ceratina dallatorreana  [popup] female
Ceratina diodonta  [popup] female
Ceratina dupla  [popup] female
Ceratina hurdi  [popup] female
Ceratina melanoptera  [popup] female
Ceratina micheneri  [popup] female
Ceratina nanula  [popup] female
Ceratina neomexicana  [popup] female
Ceratina pacifica  [popup] female
Ceratina punctigena  [popup] female
Ceratina sequoiae  [popup] female
Ceratina shinnersi  [popup] female
Ceratina sp_new1  [popup] female
Ceratina sp_new2  [popup] female
Ceratina strenua  [popup] female
Ceratina tejonensis  [popup] female
Ceratina texana  [popup] female
Ceratina timberlakei  [popup] female


REMAINING (number with state)
9. C. hurdi vs C. nanula, combination of characters - No female specimens of C. hurdi have been viewed for this guide
 C. hurdi - Rarely collected, distribution limited to the central coast range of California, hard to positively identify without associated males, according to Daly 1973 when compared with C. nanula from two similar locations the mesepisturnum pits were smaller and more than a pit width apart, medial area of T6 less rugose, and the body color was blue rather than green - These characters may not hold true with other populations (1)
 C. nanula Widespread, according to Daly 1973 when compared with C. hurdi females from two similar locations the mesepisturnum pits were larger and a pit width or less apart, medial area of T6 more rugose, and the body color was green rather than blue - These characters may not hold true with other populations (1)
Abdomen, T6, Surface features
 Surface with only a small shallow central depressed area or none at all, no longitudinal ridge, and no tufts of hair, when the lateral profile is viewed the slope is uniform and smooth (20)
 With a small central depression but not one filled with hair, looking at the segment from the side this central depressions causes the profile of the segment to have a rounded or angular notch in the surface of T6 (5)
 A small tuft of hair filling a centrally located depression in the middle of the middle of the segment, this hair is best seen from the lateral profile (2)
 A Longitudinal line or very narrow ridge runs down the center of nearly the tip, this ridge can often be a bit vague, often rugged and not smooth, but clearly different from the surrounding surface sculpturing and usually becomes most prominent towards the tip of the abdomen (1)
C. acantha vs C. micheneri
 C. acantha - Mesepisternal pitting very sparse often spaced more than two or more pit widths apart (1)
 C. micheneri - Mesepisternal pitting more dense, pits spaced one pit apart or less (1)
C. acantha vs C. nanula - Combination of characters
 C. acantha - Lateral sides of propodeum with extremely dense pitting such that the tiny pits in the central area sometimes indistinct, in comparison pits smaller and denser - Rear face of central area of T6 either flat or with only a faintly hollow, when viewed from the side the profile of T6 is slightly but uniformly concave - Scutum with a longitudinal line running down the middle, at the anterior edge it is SLIGHTLY depressed below the surface, similar to what would happen if you lay a small rod across the surface of a balloon - Distance between lateral ocelli smaller than or about equal to the distance from lateral ocelli to the rear edge of the head (1)
 C. nanula - Lateral sides of propodeum with extremely dense pitting BUT individual pits remaining distinct even in the central area because they are larger and slightly less dense in comparison - Rear face of central area of T6 unmistakenly hollow, though not deeply so, when viewed from the side the profile is concave, but not uniformly so, the aforementioned hollow area causing the profile to take on a slightly angular appearance - Scutum with a longitudinal line running down the middle, at the anterior edge it is NOT depressed below the surface, the line simply running to the edge without creating any form of depressed area or trough, the surrounding surface not depressed - Distance between lateral ocelli larger than or about equal to the distance from lateral ocelli to the rear edge of the head (1)
C. acantha vs C. neomexicana
 C. acantha - Mesepisternal pitting very sparse often spaced more than two or more pit widths apart - Anterior end of hypostomal carina rounded (1)
 C. neomexicana - Mesepisternal pitting more dense, pits spaced one pit apart or less - Anterior end of hypostomal carina toothed and slightly higher than posteriorly (1)
C. apacheorum vs. C. neomexicana, combination of characters
 C. apacheorum - Region between antenna and compound eye with either no pits or only a very few in a line next to the eye - Hypostomal carina uniform in height throughout its length - Carina at rear margin of head clearly present (1)
 C. neomexicana - Region between antenna and compound eye with either many pits throughout the area - Hypostomal carina SLIGHTLY higher towards the front than the rear - Carina at rear margin of head absent or only difficult to detect (1)
C. apacheorum vs. C. timberlakei - Combination of characters
 C. apacheorum - Small, MOST of the time less than 6mm in length - In the specimens we have seen the overall base color is blue - Remarkably similar species despite clear size differences - Transmontane California and southwestern states (1)
 C. timberlakei - Large, MOST of the time more than 6mm in length - In the specimens we have seen the overall base color is blue-green to olive gold - Remarkably similar despite clear size differences - Cismontane California (1)
C. calcarata vs C. dupla - Note that these two species are very closely related and can be exceptionally difficult to distinguish - Expect some to not resolve
 C. calcarata - Immediately to either side of the line that runs down the center of the scutum, there is ONE column of pits. This column varies from complete to incomplete, sometimes having gaps where pits are not present. There are rarely additional columns of incomplete pits. Also, running along the INSIDE of the parapsidal line, which is a groove in the scutum running near the tegula, there is ONE column of pits that is almost always INCOMPLETE, usually with NO additional incomplete rows, note that pits cover the entire anterior portion of the scutum in both species - In the propodeal triangle, the basal striations extend about two-thirds or more of the way down the horizontal portion of the triangle in the center, decreasing strongly towards the sides, this leaves the rim of the horizontal portion unstriated, the striations are generally widely spaced and clearly separable from their neighbors, additionally the entire horizontal portion of the triangle tends to be longer in comparison to that in C. dupla (1)
 C. dupla - Immediately to either side of the line that runs down the center of the scutum there is one COMPLETE, uniform, regularly spaced column of pits that are generally paralleled by 2-3 ADDITIONAL complete or incomplete rows of pits. Also, running along the INSIDE of the parapsidal line there is ONE COMPLETE column of pits that is generally paralleled by 1-2 ADDITIONAL incomplete or complete columns of pits - The basal striations of the propodeal triangle extend usually rather uniformly about two-thirds of the way down the horizontal portion of the triangle and across the entire width, these striations are usually dense enough that it is difficult to discriminate individual members or striate (1)
C. cobaltina, C. sp new1 and C. sp new2 vs all others - SELECT all others
 All others - Females specimens were used to create the guide (21)
 C. cobaltina, C. sp new1 and C. sp new2 - Female specimens were NOT available during the creation of the guide (3)
C. cockerelli vs C. arizonensis Tricky pair, not currently known to be distinguishable except by distribution
 C. arizonensis - Females not distinguishable from females of C. cockerelli, distribution is vital, it is found in the Texas panhandle and west to California (1)
 C. cockerelli - Females are not distinguishable from females of C. arizonensis by morphology, distribution is vital, it is found south of the Texas panhandle and east to Florida (1)
C. hurdi vs C. timberlakei, body size - No female specimens of C. hurdi have been viewed for this guide
 C. hurdi - Smaller, 4-6 mm (1)
 C. timberlakei - Larger, 6-9 mm (1)
C. melanoptera vs all others. forewing color
 All others - Wing similarly colored throughout, although some may be slightly darker at the apex (22)
 C. melanoptera - Apex of forewing distinctly darker than base of wing (1)
C. micheneri vs C. tejonensis, abdomen, T6, pitting in median area
 C. micheneri - Median area coarse and rough (1)
 C. tehonesis - Median area flat with pits visible amidst the surface lines and bumps under close inspection (1)
C. nanula vs C. shinnersi, distribution - Identification without associated males difficult
 C. nanula - Found in western Texas at higher elevations (1)
 C. shinnersi - Found in western Texas at lower elevations and eastern Texas (1)
C. nanula vs C. timberlakei - Combination of characters
 C. nanula - Density of pits along the anterior edge of the scutellum about the same as that along the posterior edge, has more than a simple line of pits, the area in the center may be pitted or bare - Rear face of central area of T6 unmistakenly hollow, though not deeply so, when viewed from the side the profile is concave, but not uniformly so, the aforementioned hollow area causing the profile to take on a slightly angular appearance - IN COMPARISON, averages smaller and with more pits on face (1)
 C. timberlakei - Density of pits along the anterior edge of the scutellum lower than that along the posterior edge, usually only a simple line of pits, the area in the center largely bare spots - Rear face of central area of T6 either flat or with only faintly hollow, when viewed from the side the profile of T6 is slightly but uniformly concave - IN COMPARISON, averages larger and with fewer pits on face (1)
C. neomexicana vs C. timberlakei - Combination of characters
 C. neomexicana - Region between antenna and compound eye with many pits throughout the area, most pits within 1 diameter distance from another or less - IN MOST CASES, Distance between the edges of the antennal fossae, these are the holes going into the head, about the same as between the fossae and the inner edge of the compound eye (1)
 C. timberlakei - Region between antenna and compound eye with only a very few scattered pits, all usually spaced much more than 1 pit diameter apart - IN MOST CASES, Distance between the edges of the antennal fossae, these are the holes going into the head, more than between the fossae and the inner edge of the compound eye - First recurrent vein joins the second submarginal cell about 2 vein widths from the second submarginal crossvein (1)
C. sequoiae vs all others, thorax, pitting
 All others - Pits on mesepisternum adjacent to pronotal lobes and base of wings distinct, may be separated or touching but their essential nature is clear (20)
 C. sequoiae - Pits merging, not distinctly separate, forming a rough surface on mesepisternum adjacent to pronotal lobe and base of wings (1)
Front leg, coxa, shape
 Looks like the normal bee coxa, roughly triangular, the sides smooth and uninterrupted (20)
 The outer most corner, which is up towards the head, is pulled far out from the rest of the coxa as if someone grabbed it with their fingers smashed it and pulled it outward like a piece of gum, resulting in a projecting roundish flat ear lobe or spatula like thing - Present only in 2 very small species (2)
Front leg, tibia, markings
 Small ivory mark on base of tibia, but no mark on adjacent end of femur (14)
 Ivory stripe running just about the entire length, ivory mark also on adjacent end of femur (3)
 Small ivory mark on base of tibia and adjacent end of femur (3)
 Ivory stripe running down 1/3 to 2/3 of length, lacking mark on femur, specimen collected OUTSIDE of Florida (2)
 Ivory strip running down 1/2 of length, ivory mark also on adjacent end of femur (1)
 Ivory stripe running down about 1/3 of length, lacking mark on femur, specimen collected WITHIN Florida (1)
Head, cheek or gena, region just below the mandibles, look at it from the side
 Others - The normal smooth profile of the cheek (20)
 C. punctigena - A clear squared corner breaks the normal smooth curve of the cheek (1)
Head, clypeus, color
 Having an ivory mark or stripe (21)
 Clypeus entirely dark (5)
Head, hypostomal carina
 Anterior end smoothly curved toward the base of the mandibles and the height of the carina the same height throughout (16)
 Anterior end toothed, or right angled (10)
Head, parocular area, pitting
 30-90 percent coverage (15)
 5-15 percent coverage (5)
 95-100 percent coverage (5)
 0-5 percent, relatively smooth, the only pitting is a single line that borders the eye (2)
Head, preoccipital ridge or carina
 Absent, no ridge, carina or sharp line demarking the back of the head just a smooth rounded surface (18)
 Present, but the transition NOT with a dramatically raised above the surface of the head flange, instead it appears as a sharp, abrupt transition between the surface of the head and the underside, the underside often noticeably flat for a short ways after the transition, at times there is a low insignificant ridge or noticeable line along the boundary (9)
Parocular pitting
 30-100 percent (15)
 0-15 percent (7)
State or province where bee was collected
 CA (13)
 TX (13)
 AZ (7)
 OR (7)
 NM (6)
 NV (6)
 UT (6)
 ID (5)
 CO (4)
 FL (4)
 GA (4)
 MS (4)
 NC (4)
 SC (4)
 WA (4)
 AL (3)
 British Columbia (3)
 CT (3)
 DC (3)
 DE (3)
 IA (3)
 IL (3)
 IN (3)
 KS (3)
 KY (3)
 LA (3)
 MA (3)
 MD (3)
 MI (3)
 MO (3)
 NJ (3)
 NY (3)
 OH (3)
 OK (3)
 PA (3)
 RI (3)
 TN (3)
 VA (3)
 WI (3)
 WV (3)
 WY (3)
 ME (2)
 MN (2)
 MT (2)
 Manitoba (2)
 ND (2)
 NE (2)
 NH (2)
 New Brunswick (2)
 Nova Scotia (2)
 Ontario (2)
 Quebec (2)
 SD (2)
 VT (2)
 AR (1)
 Northwest Territories (1)
Subgenus
 Zadontomerus (18)
 Ceratinula (2)
 Calloceratina (1)
 Euceratina (1)
Thorax, mesepisternum, pitting
 Pitting dense, pits spaced less than a pit apart (17)
 Pitting sparse, pits spaced more than a pit apart (8)
Thorax, pronotal lobe, color
 Ivory marking obvious and apparent (19)
 Entirely dark (5)
 Ivory marking reduced to a small almost unnoticed spot (4)