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Discover Life 20 kinds match:
Halictus confusus  [popup] female
Halictus confusus  [popup] male
Halictus farinosus  [popup] female
Halictus farinosus  [popup] male
Halictus harmonius  [popup] female
Halictus harmonius  [popup] male
Halictus ligatus  [popup] female
Halictus ligatus  [popup] male
Halictus parallelus  [popup] female
Halictus parallelus  [popup] male
Halictus poeyi  [popup] female
Halictus poeyi  [popup] male
Halictus rubicundus  [popup] female
Halictus rubicundus  [popup] male
Halictus tectus  [popup] female
Halictus tectus  [popup] male
Halictus tripartitus  [popup] female
Halictus tripartitus  [popup] male
Halictus virgatellus  [popup] female
Halictus virgatellus  [popup] male


REMAINING (number with state)
Body length, in mm
 8 (12)
 9 (12)
 10 (10)
 11 (10)
 7 (10)
 12 (7)
 6 (7)
 13 (5)
 14 (4)
 5 (4)
 4 (3)
 15 (2)
 3 (2)
Female - H. parallelus vs H. rubicundus
 H. parallelus - Distance between lateral ocelli less than between distance between lateral ocelli and rear of head - Region between pits on scutum does not reflect light - The tibial spur on the rear leg that is nearest the abdomen has small uniformly spaced teath, often difficult to see due to the position of the leg and the need for high magnification (1)
 H. rubicundus - Distance between lateral ocelli greater than between distance between lateral ocelli and rear of head - Region between pits on scutum reflective and clearly reflects the light from microscopes - The tibial spur on the rear leg that is nearest the abdomen has teeth that clearly range in size (1)
Female, H. confusus vs H. tripartitus
 H. confusus - Subantennal suture 9/10 as long as distance between junctures of epistomal suture with subantennal sutures, thus making the supraclypeus appear nearly square - Central dorsal portion of propodium with irregular rugae, not forming a clear pattern of basal striations - H. confusus is slightly larger in direct comparison (1)
 H. tripartitus - Subantennal sutures 6/10 as long as distance between junctures of epistomal suture with subantennal sutures, thus making the supraclypeus somewhat rectangular - Central dorsal triangular portion of propodium with a linear pattern of parallel bumps, rugulae, or striations radiating from the base where it joins the metanotum (1)
Female, H. confusus vs H. virgatellus
 H. confusus - Metallic sheen of integument usually clearly a dark green, most visible on scutum, although some specimens may appear dark, particularly if poorly prepared - Malar space, the distance between the base of the mandible and the bottom of the eye, short, its minimum length often half the width of the rim of the compound eye - Striations in the dorsal propodeal triangle often but not always running fully to the rim of the triangle, filling or nearly filling the triangle and often terminating with a series of distinct, transverse striations which traverse the width of the triangle before the transition to the vertical, rear face of the propodeum (1)
 H. virgatellus - Metallic sheen of the integument often black with only weak dark green reflections, usually appearing black - Malar space long, its minimum length equal to or exceeding the width of the rim of the compound eye - Dorsal propodeal triangle often but not always unsculptured along the rim, distinct striations extending only 40-70 percent of the way to the rim with this unsculptured area appearing distinctly less roughened than the basal area of the triangle, may or may not have transverse striations, although they usually appear weaker and of lesser width than those of H. confusus (1)
Female, H. farinosus vs H. rubicundus
 H. farinosus - usually larger, 12-16mm outer margin of inner tibial spur on hind leg with small regular teeth surface between pits on T1 dull apical hair band on T1 evenly thick medially as laterally (1)
 H. rubicundus - usually smaller, 10-12mm outer margin of inner tibial spur on hind leg with irregular teeth surface between pits on T1 shiny apical hair band on T1 narrows medially (1)
Female, H. parallelus vs H. farinosus
 H. farinosus - Distance between lateral ocelli greater than or equal to the distance from the lateral ocelli to back of rim of the head - Basitibial plate more u shaped, rounded - Foretibia brown - Reflectivity of the scutellum between pits shiny (1)
 H. parallelus - Distance between lateral ocelli less than the distance from lateral ocelli to back rim of the head - Basitibial plate more v shaped, angled - Foretibia reddish or yellowish - Reflectivity of the scutellum between pits dull (1)
Female, H. rubicundus vs. H. virgatellus
 H. rubicundus - Overall color dark brown, no metallic reflections - T1 dull between pits - Comparatively much larger (1)
 H. virgatellus - Overall color dark brown, but normally with strong metallic reflections, particularly on the scutum - T1 shiny between pits - Comparatively much smaller (1)
Female, H. tripartitus vs H. virgatellus
 H. tripartitus - Head comparatively short, hinge of mandible abuts the bottom of the eye - Striations of the dorsal triangle clear and well formed into neat parallel lines - Pits on scutum and scutellum comparatively smaller, slightly wider spaced, and surface uniformly smooth and shiny - Size comparatively smaller (1)
 H. virgatellus - Head comparatively long, with a clear space between bottom of the eye and the hinge of the mandible - Striations of the dorsal triangle vague and not forming neat columns - Pits on scutum and scutellum comparatively larger, closely spaced, and surface slightly more undulating between the pits - Size comparatively larger (1)
Female, head, cheeks
 Rounded below (8)
 Bottom rear with a very noticeable point or knob - Usually have to turn specimen over to see (2)
Female, hind leg, inner tibial spur, this is the spur closest to the abdomen, teeth - At times very difficult to see, view with high magnification
 Inner spur with irregularly sized teeth, often with spaces between each, on spur closest to the abdomen (6)
 Inner spur with regular and continuous teeth on spur closest to abdomen (4)
Female, thorax, scutum, reflectivity of surface between pits
 Shining, usually hatched by small microscopic lines, but still clearly reflecting light - watch for dirty specimens (9)
 Dull, heavily lined, tessellate, reflecting almost no light (5)
H. confusus vs H. tectus
 H. confusus - Common native species - The striated region of the upper portion of propodeum longitudinally longer than metanotum - Body hairs primarily tan-gold in color - Lacking any significant amount of appressed hairs of any color except along rims of terga (2)
 H. tectus - Rare recent European arrival - The striated region of the upper portion of propodeum longitudinally shorter than metanotum - Body hairs primarily bright white - Usually body is densely covered with short, bright white appressed hairs, particularly noticeable on the rear face of the propodeum (2)
H. ligatus vs H. poeyi
 H. ligatus - Morphologically similar to H. poeyi - Populations above Virginia are all thought to be H. ligatus (2)
 H. poeyi - Morphologically similar to H. ligatus - Populations in Florida are all thought to be H. poeyi (2)
Male, H. confusus vs H. tripartitus
 H. confusus - Leg, front trochanter and femur both the same shade of uniform light yellow-orange - Head, antenna, underside a bright yellow-orange that contrasts sharply with the brown on the upper side - In direct comparison, larger with a longer head (1)
 H. tripartitus - Leg, front trochanter brown and the adjacent basal end of the femur the same color, quickly transitioning to a light yellow-orange throughout the last three quarters of the femur - Head, antenna, underside about the same color brown as the upper side, though usually slightly lightening to a dull yellow-brown - In direct comparison, smaller with a shorter head (1)
Male, abdomen, S4, presence of a fringe of hairs bordering the rim - Look from the side as these hairs while abundant are thin and prostrate
 Absent (8)
 Present (7)
Male, abdomen, S5, rim
 Straight or only very slightly concave (8)
 Concave in the center, or angled inward (6)
Male, antenna, flagella color
 Black or Dark Brown on top and bright rusty red, brown or yellowish beneath (8)
 Entirely black, may have a VERY DULL yellow or brown cast to the underside (4)
Male, fore leg, trochanter and femur, color
 Both segments primarily dark colored, sometimes with small light patches present (7)
 Trochanter largely dark colored and femur largely light colored (3)
 Both segments primarily light colored, with some dark patches possibly present (1)
Male, head, mandible color
 Some dull to bright yellow pigmentation present (10)
 Black or brown (3)
Male, thorax, propodeal triangle
 Raised lines or striations radiating from the base toward the rim are present, these striations may be present only on the lateral sides, raised bumps can occur in between these striations so look closely before thinking striations are not there (8)
 Uniform granular bumps, rugulose, or a chained network of raised lines present with no striations (5)
Sex, number of antennal segments
 Female, 12 (10)
 Male, 13 (10)
State or province where bee was collected
 AZ (14)
 CA (14)
 ID (14)
 MT (14)
 NM (14)
 UT (14)
 WY (14)
 CO (13)
 Alberta (12)
 British Columbia (12)
 DC (12)
 DE (12)
 MD (12)
 NJ (12)
 NV (12)
 OR (12)
 PA (12)
 SD (12)
 TX (12)
 VA (12)
 WA (12)
 AL (10)
 FL (10)
 GA (10)
 IA (10)
 KS (10)
 MN (10)
 MO (10)
 MS (10)
 NC (10)
 ND (10)
 NE (10)
 NY (10)
 SC (10)
 TN (10)
 WV (10)
 IL (9)
 CT (8)
 IN (8)
 KY (8)
 LA (8)
 MA (8)
 ME (8)
 MI (8)
 NH (8)
 OH (8)
 OK (8)
 Ontario (8)
 Quebec (8)
 RI (8)
 VT (8)
 WI (8)
 AR (6)
 Manitoba (6)
 New Brunswick (6)
 Nova Scotia (6)
 Saskatchewan (6)
 AK (4)
 Newfoundland and Labrador (4)
 Northwest Territories (4)
 Prince Edward Island (3)
Subgenus
 Seladonia (10)
 Nealictus (4)
 Odontalictus (4)
 Protohalictus (2)
Thorax, color - If your microscope light is not bright you may see the dark greens and blues as black
 Black to dark brown - NO metallic reflections - Clypeus is clearly the same dark brown or black as the rest of the head and thorax (10)
 DARK metallic green or blue - Note, poor light or very high magnification makes this hard to see - The clypeus is brown and clearly much darker than the rest of the head and thorax which has dark metallic green or bluish reflections (10)