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Discover Life 75 kinds match:
Nomada MR_1  [popup] female
Nomada MR_2  [popup] female
Nomada adducta  [popup] female
Nomada affabilis  [popup] female
Nomada alpha  [popup]
Nomada angelarum  [popup]
Nomada annulata  [popup] female
Nomada aquilarum  [popup] female
Nomada armatella  [popup] female
Nomada articulata  [popup] female
Nomada ashmeadi  [popup]
Nomada augustiana  [popup] female
Nomada australis  [popup] female
Nomada autumnalis  [popup] female
Nomada banksi  [popup] female
Nomada bethunei  [popup] female
Nomada bohartorum  [popup]
Nomada capillata  [popup]
Nomada composita  [popup] female
Nomada crawfordi  [popup]
Nomada cressonii  [popup] female
Nomada crudelis  [popup] female
Nomada dentariae  [popup] female
Nomada denticulata  [popup] female
Nomada depressa  [popup] female
Nomada detrita  [popup]
Nomada dreisbachi  [popup] female
Nomada edwardsii  [popup]
Nomada electa  [popup] female
Nomada electella  [popup] female
Nomada elegantula  [popup]
Nomada erigeronis  [popup] female
Nomada fervida  [popup] female
Nomada festiva  [popup] female
Nomada florilega  [popup] female
Nomada formula  [popup]
Nomada fragariae  [popup] female
Nomada gracilis  [popup] female
Nomada graenicheri  [popup] female
Nomada grayi  [popup]
Nomada gutierreziae  [popup]
Nomada hemphilli  [popup]
Nomada illinoensis  [popup] female
Nomada imbricata  [popup] female
Nomada integerrima  [popup] female
Nomada lehighensis  [popup] female
Nomada limata  [popup]
Nomada luteola  [popup] female
Nomada luteoloides  [popup] female
Nomada mendica  [popup]
Nomada micheneri  [popup] female
Nomada miniata  [popup] female
Nomada minima  [popup]
Nomada obliterata  [popup] female
Nomada parva  [popup] female
Nomada placida  [popup] female
Nomada pygmaea  [popup] female
Nomada rodecki  [popup] female
Nomada rubicunda  [popup] female
Nomada salicis  [popup] female
Nomada sayi  [popup] female
Nomada seneciophila  [popup] female
Nomada sobrina  [popup] female
Nomada sphaerogaster  [popup] female
Nomada sulphurata  [popup] female
Nomada superba  [popup] female
Nomada texana  [popup] female
Nomada tiftonensis  [popup] female
Nomada townesi  [popup] female
Nomada ulsterensis  [popup] female
Nomada valida  [popup] female
Nomada vegana  [popup] female
Nomada vicina  [popup] female
Nomada vincta  [popup] female
Nomada xanthura  [popup]


REMAINING (number with state)
Abdomen, T1, presence and position of yellow markings
 None (33)
 A CONTINUOUS stripe from side to side (27)
 A stripe that is broken in the middle, sometimes by only a thin line (18)
 2 widely spaced rounded patches (13)
Abdomen, T2 and T3, absence or presence and longitudinal length of an essentially unpitted region in the center of the segment - Note that the very edge of the apical rim always has no pits for about 1-3 pit diameters
 Unpitted region narrow, one-fifth or less of the segment (44)
 Pitting extends to the rim (35)
 Unpitted region wider, more than than one-fifth of the segment (16)
 Entire tergite is unpitted (2)
Abdomen, T2, presence and position of yellow markings
 A CONTINUOUS stripe from side to side (28)
 2 widely spaced rounded patches (27)
 A stripe that is broken in the middle, sometimes by only a thin line (21)
 None (10)
Abdomen, T3, presence and position of yellow markings
 2 widely spaced rounded patches (32)
 A CONTINUOUS stripe from side to side (25)
 A stripe that is broken in the middle, sometimes by only a thin line (24)
 None (22)
Abdomen, T4, presence and position of yellow markings
 A CONTINUOUS stripe from side to side (37)
 None (19)
 A stripe that is broken in the middle, sometimes by only a thin line (18)
 2 widely spaced rounded patches (11)
Abdomen, T5, presence/absence and position of yellow markings
 Present, entirely yellow, or 1 or 2 patches (50)
 Absent (18)
EXPERIENCED USERS - Hair on antennal scape and labrum - often these hairs occur elsewhere, but are most obvious on the scape and labrum
 Only the normal transluscent white or yelowish hairs found throughout the thorax and head (59)
 In addition to the normal transluscent white or yellowish hairs there are hairs that are longer, stiffer, more upright, and opaque red, scattered sparsely - can be easily overlooked (7)
EXPERIENCED USERS - Hind leg, tibia, COLOR of small spine or setae like hairs located along the apical end of the tibia on the opposite side of the two large tibial spurs - do not count the almost always present small triangular bump or projection that is located on the abdomen side of this same face
 Red (45)
 White or Clear (25)
 Yellow (15)
 No setae - look VERY closely (6)
EXPERIENCED USERS - Hind leg, tibia, LENGTH of small spine or setae like hairs located along the apical end of the tibia on the opposite side of the two large tibial spurs - do not count the almost always present small triangular bump or projection that is located on the abdomen side of this same face
 Clearly beyond the surrounding white hairs (48)
 Approximately equal to the surrounding white hairs (35)
 Clearly shorter than the surrounding white hairs (30)
 No setae - look VERY closely (6)
EXPERIENCED USERS - Hind leg, tibia, NUMBER of small spine or setae like hairs located along the apical end of the tibia on the opposite side of the two large tibial spurs - do not count the almost always present small triangular bump or projection that is located on the abdomen side of this same face
 3 - 5 (45)
 6 - 10 (30)
 2 (23)
 over 10 (16)
 0 (6)
 1 (4)
EXPERIENCED USERS - Hind leg, tibia, WIDTH of small spine or setae like hairs located along the apical end of the tibia on the opposite side of the two large tibial spurs - do not count the almost always present small triangular bump or projection that is located on the abdomen side of this same face
 Thick - about twice as thick as the surrounding hairs (47)
 Thin - only slightly thicker than the surrounding hairs (19)
 No setae - look VERY closely (6)
Head, antenna, flagellar segment 1
 Length longer than width (59)
 Greatest width equal to or broader than length (15)
Head, antenna, flagellar segment 1 versus 2 - measuring along each segments LONGEST side
 2 greater than 1 (49)
 1 greater than 2 (22)
 1 and 2 equal (20)
Head, antenna, flagellar segment 2 versus 3 , measuring along each segments LONGEST side
 2 greater than 3 (60)
 2 and 3 equal (18)
 3 greater than 2 (11)
Head, antenna, flagellar segments 6 and 7
 Length longer than width (59)
 Width equal to or broader than length (15)
Head, cheek, the rim that parallels the side of the eye
 Cheek ends smoothly without change in shape (44)
 Very edge of rim bent outward - carinate - most of the time there is only a very narrow strip involved (36)
Head, clypeus, PRIMARY color
 Red or Orange (40)
 Yellow (38)
 Black (12)
 White (1)
Head, labrum, the location of the small nub or projection present along an an imaginary line that runs lengthwise down the middle from top center to bottom center
 One-third of way from bottom (38)
 Center (25)
 Bottom, at the bottom of this line the apex of the labrum (22)
 One-third of the way from top (4)
Head, mandible, BIDENTATE, distinct notched projection forming a tooth-like bump found less than one quarter the way from the tip on the upper side to the mandible
 Absent (65)
 Present and common - However, note that this group of species is poorly defined and resolved by existing keys and it is best to leave them identified as bidentate group species and divide your specimens into obvious different species by eye (2)
Head, supraclypeus, PRIMARY color
 Red or Orange (31)
 Yellow (28)
 Black (22)
IMPORTANT - Please Click Here to Remove Provisional Western Species
 NOT recommended - Include some provisional western species (68)
 RECOMMENDED - Eastern Nomada ONLY (62)
N. affabilis, N. annulata, N. fragariae, N. imbricata, N. luteola, N. luteoloides, N. micheneri, N. sulphurata
 N. affabilis - Head, frons or face above antennae, with extensive RED, usually more red than black - Cheek or gena, lower edge, opaque and only slightly lipped - Antennae, flagellar segment 1 length, LONGER THAN length of 2nd flagellar segment, which is unique - Thorax, propodeal triangle sides, usually YELLOW Hind leg, tibia setae, with MORE than 10 yellow or clear setae (1)
 N. fragariae - Thorax, propodeum, rear face, with ABSOLUTELY NO LONG HAIR, which is unique since the other species have copious, long hair on the segment - Hind leg, with 4-6 tibial setae, that are long, about the length of the surrounding white hairs and curved outward, NOT over toward the side - In direct comparison with the other Nomada, the microscopic projecting hairs on the underside of the antennae, not the appressed minute ones on the surface, are clearly LONGER (1)
 N. imbricata - Head and thorax, always with at least SOME RED present, even in the darkest individuals - Head, cheek, lower edge, OPAQUE and only slightly LIPPED, or carinate - Thorax, propodeal triangle sides, invaded with yellow or red, differentiating it from N. luteolodies - Hind leg, tibia apex, with FEWER than 5 setae, that are STRONGLY bent sideways along the edge of the rim - Most often confused with N. luteoloides (1)
 N. luteola - Head, face, usually extensively yellow and red - Cheek, carina or lip, very wide and transparent, though dark in coloration, which except N. michenri is unique - Thorax, propodeal triangle sides, YELLOW - Hind leg, tibia, with MORE THAN 10 short peg-like setae, comparitively, usually more than N. sulphurata - Most often confused with N. sulphurata (1)
 N. luteoloides - Head, cheek, lower edge, opaque and only slightly lipped - Thorax, propodial triangle, color, ALL BLACK differentiating it from N. imbricata - Hind leg, tibia, with FEWER than 5 setae, setae STRONGLY curved to the side - Southern populations - Overall body color, usually strictly BLACK with yellow markings - New England,Canadian, and Appalachian populations - Overall body coloration, with limited to extensive amounts of red on the head, thorax, and even the abdomen - Most often confused with N. imbricata due to its similarity in coloration (1)
 N. micheneri - Head, face, color, BLACK - Cheek, edge, transparent, thin, and wide - Thorax, propodial triangle sides, YELLOW - Hind leg, tibia, with FEWER than 10 straight setae - NOTE - We havent seen any specimens of this species and the male has not been described so urge caution in making determinations, and urge you to send possible specimens to us for verification (1)
 N. sulphurata - Head, face, usually WITHOUT black markings, but can have extensive black or red - Cheek, carina or lip, small and opaque - Thorax, propodeal triangle sides, YELLOW - Hind leg, tibia, with more than or fewer than 10 peg like, STRAIGHT setae - Most often confused with N. luteola (1)
N. annulata vs. N. vincta
 N. annulata - Thorax, scutum, color, mix of yellow and red on a black field - Mesepisternum, color, with extensive red surrounding the large yellow patch - Season, spring to early summer (1)
 N. vincta - Thorax, scutum, color, almost entirely BLACK with at most a small amount of yellow on the far sides - Mesepisternum, color, with a moderate sized yellow patch and no red present - Season, primarily a late summer or fall species (1)
N. armatella vs. N. bethunei
 N. armatella - Hind leg, tibia, with 4-5 THIN WHITE setae that PROECT a bit beyond the surrounding shorter white hairs (1)
 N. bethunei - Hind leg, tibia, with 6 or more short STOUT RED setae that do NOT project beyond the surrounding white hairs (1)
N. augustiana vs. N. bethunei
 N. augustiana - Hind leg, tibia, usually with only 3-6 setae that are clearly MUCH longer than the surrounding white hairs (1)
 N. bethunei - Hind leg, tibia, usually with more than 6 setae that are, so SHORT they often appear to be absent, setae never projecting beyond surrounding white hairs - Best seen by looking at tibia end-on (1)
N. bethunei vs. N. cressonii
 N. bethunei - Thorax, propodeum, rear face, with extensive YELLOW PATCHES - Abdomen, T2-T4, with extensive yellow, often forming stripes or interrupted stripes - Head, face, with extensive yellow or yellow-orange throughout (1)
 N. cressonii - Thorax, propodeum, rear face, WITHOUT any yellow - Abdomen, T2-T4, yellow largely limited to the far sides - Head, face, with only red or black (1)
N. composita vs. N. lehighensis
 N. composita - Head, antennae, flagellar segment 1, LIGHT BROWN compared to the dark chocolate brown of flagellar segment 2-9 - Flagellar segment 1, long edge, less than or equal to length flagellar segment 3 - Clypeus and scape, hair, long, obvious, upright and DARK REDDISH, clearly contrast the normal white hairs on the same segments and the rest of the body - NOTE - Must be held in the right light for hairs to be visible - Cheek, lower edge, noticeably but narrowly curled outward - Abdomen, T2 and T3, with BRIGHT YELLOW PATCHES that are sharply demarcated (1)
 N. lehighensis - Head, antennae, flagellar segments 2-9, light BROWNISH RED, with flagellar segment 1 only slightly lighter in color - Flagellar segment 1, long side, clearly longer than the length of flagellar segment 3 - Clypeus and scape, hair, WHITE or only lightly infused with red, and similar in size and shape to the hairs on the rest of the body - Cheek, lower rim, either UNALTERED or with only a faint hint of a bend - Abdomen, T2 and T3, with extremely small, smudgy DULL YELLOW MARKS on the far sides (1)
N. cressonii vs. N. denticulata
 N. cressonii - Front leg, coxa, WITHOUT any stub or spine - Head, cheek, lower rim, usually slightly upturned - Abdomen, T2, pits extensively invade the impressed area of the rim leaving a region less than one quarter of the longitudinal length of the tergite or less without pits - Tegula with pits often greater than 1 pit diameter apart and decreasing in density towards the outer rim (1)
 N. denticulata - Front leg, coxa, with a small TRIANGULAR STUB where the spine would be in other species, this often difficult to see without probing the area with a pin- Head, Cheek, lower rim, usually SMOOTH - Abdomen, T2, pits usually ending right at the boundary of the impressed area leaving a wide unpitted region along the rim - Tegula with pits uniformly 1 pit diameter or less apart and continuing at the same density all the way to the rim (1)
N. cressonii, N. parva, N. pygmaea, N. illinoensis, N. sayi - NOTE - These are all common species that are almost ALWAYS confused by the beginning practitioner, they have no completely unambiguous characteres that always separate all specimens, and usually require comparative material as well as an expectation that some will not resolve
 N. sayi and N. illinoensis - It is uclear if N. sayi and N. illinoensis are different species, at this point the BIML group does not differentiate the two - These species are characterized by thin mandibles and small size, but see comments under N. pygmaea and N. parva for further means of differentiating this group from the others (2)
 N. cressonii - LARGEST species - Usually separated by its large size, T5 with clear yellow markings, and a pseudopygidium that is comparatively wider than the others - In comparison, N. pygmaea almost never has anything more than yellow smudges on T5 or T4, N. sayi-illinoensis-parva are smaller in size with slender mandibles - Note that N. denticulata is often confused with this species (1)
 N. parva - Usually the SMALLEST species, but there is overlap with N. sayi and N. illinoensis who average slightly larger - T2 and T3 with small pale yellow circular marks on the FAR lateral sides - Tergites shiny and WITHOUT any pitting - T4 with a complete latitudinal basal dark band, this band not completely black but as dark as the dark marks found on the LATERAL edges of the base of T1 - note that other species have the base of T1 blacker and this mark goes COMPLETELY across the segment, many have PITTING on T2 but many also do not, other small species almost always have relatively larger spots on the lateral sides of T2 and 3 and these often extent to T5, these spots area also more sharply defines and of a brighter color (1)
 N. pygmaea - An INTERMEDIATE sized species - Abdomen, yellow coloring, usually restricted to lateral patches on T2-T3 - In direct comparison to the smaller species, which it can overlap in size with, the mandibles are thicker and not as long, additionally, when viewed from the side, in profile, the top of the clypeus clearly rises upwards from the base of the supraclypeus to the rim and is readily visible most of the way above the profile of the compound eye, in contrast the smaller species clypeus, in profile, angles upward hardly at all and is visible above the level of the compound eye only towards the end - In contrast to N. cressonii N. pygmaea never appears to have anything more than indistinct yellow smudges on T4-5, but N. cressonii may not have markings on those tergites either, in comparison the pseudopygidial area is narrower and longer than N. cressonii (1)
N. fervida, N. vegana, N. texana, N. tiftonensis
 N. fervida - Hind led, end of tibia, with more than 25 TIGHTLY PACKED setae - Season, late spring and early summer - Thorax, propodeum, rear face, ENTIRELY BLACK - Size, in comparison with N. vegana and N. texana, the largest (1)
 N. texana - Thorax, propodeum, rear face, ENTIRELY BLACK - Season, late summer - Size, in comparison with N. fervida and N. vegana, is the smallest - Northern populations, those at least north of North Carolina - Hind leg, end of tibia, with 7-10 FAT YELLOW to clear setae, these PROJECTING prominently beyond the surrounding white hairs - Southern populations - Hind leg, end of tibia, with much shorter setae, and have previously been described as a separate species (1)
 N. vegana - Hind leg, end of tibia, setae so SMALL as to appear ABSENT beneath the white hairs - Season, during early summer - Thorax, propodeum, rear face with YELLOW PATCHES - Size, in comparison with N. fervida and N. texana, is mid-sized (1)
N. integerrima vs. N. lehighensis
 N. integerrima - Head, labrum, projecting point in the longitudinal center of the segment but about ONE THIRD of the way from the bottom - Hind leg, tibia, with 4-5 red setae, that are very LONG and extend well beyond the surrounding white hairs - Middle leg, tibia, leg with setae that are similar to hind leg but fewer - T2, with pits that go nearly to the edge of the segment (1)
 N. lehighensis - Head, labrum, projecting point is located in the very CENTER of the segment - Hind leg, tibia, usually with 3 or sometimes 4 red setae that extend about the same length as the surrounding white hairs - Middle leg, tibia apex, with NO or only 1 to 2 setae that are similar to those on the rear leg- T2, along rim, with a wide region WITHOUT pits (1)
N. texana vs N. tiftonensis
 N. texana - S3 and S4 with narrow ivory or pale yellow transverse bands - T3 with an uninterrupted latitudinally transverse yellow band - Hind tibia setae number from 3-5 and extend only to about the same length as the surrounding white hairs - See N. texana species page for additional details on differentiating (1)
 N. tiftonensis - S3 and S4 entirely black, lacking any markings - T3 normally with a widely interrupted latitudinally transverse yellow band...in rare instances these may be slightly connected - Hind tibia setae number from 7-10 and extend beyond the surrounding white hairs - See N. texana species page for additional details on differentiating (1)
Rare to uncommon species Sam still needs to find and score - N. dentariae and N. miniata - unlikely to be found in most collections
 RECOMMENDED - Click here to eliminate these species from the system (71)
 Display these species (12)
Red-haired Species - Species with upright bristles of red hair that stand above the normal white hairs, these hairs particularly prominent on the scape and labrum. All have very long and thin mandibles that stretch at least to and often surpass the edge of the hypostomal cavity. All spring species have no yellow marks on T1. Expect some specimens to lie inbetween the descriptions presented below
 N. composita - Abdomen, T2 and T3, with small to very SMALL yellow patches - Head, cheek, carinate - Pseudopygidial area unique in that among the usually silvery hairs are longer white hairs that project slightly beyond the pseudopygidial area, these similar in thickness to those on the rest of the abdomen - Hind leg, tibia, usually with 2 setae (1)
 N. depressa - Season, mid to late spring - Abdomen, T2-T5, usually with strong yellow patches on the sides, but can be dots in some individuals or complete interrupted stripes - Head, cheek, USUALLY, but not always, strongly carinate - Antenna, color, red-brown - Hind leg, tibia, with 3-6 setae - In comparison, red hairs not as noticeable as in the other springs species, but a pseudopygidial patch that is half or more the longitudinal length of T5 is distinctive (1)
 N. valida - Abdomen, with NO yellow markings - The tips of the psuedopygidial hairs are distinctly squared off at least along the rim - Setae on hind tibia 3-7 - Cheek rim not carinate - A rare northern species (1)
 N. vicina - Season, late summer to fall species - Abdomen, T1-T5, yellow markings forming STRIPES or broken stripes - Head, cheek, CARINATE - Antenna, color, dark BROWN-BLACK - Hind leg, tibia, with 3-4 setae - In comparison, red hairs not as noticeable as in the other species, so at times they may be missed (1)
 N. xanthura - Season, late spring, early summer - Abdomen, T1 with no yellow, T2-T5, yellow markings forming nearly complete stripes broken in the center by a thin reddish line - Pseudopygidial area narro and long - Head, rim of cheek, clearly CARINATE - Antenna, color, red - Hind leg, tibia, with 3-4 setae (1)
Species for which only males are described - N. autumnalis, N. capillata, N. detrita, N. dreisbachi, N. minima, N. mendica, N. orba, N. rodecki, N. salicis, N. sobrina, N. townesi, N. ulsterensis
 RECOMMENDED - Click here to eliminate these species from the system (63)
 Display only these species (12)
State or province where bee was collected
 NJ (45)
 OH (44)
 PA (44)
 DE (43)
 NC (43)
 Ontario (43)
 VA (43)
 IL (42)
 IN (42)
 MD (42)
 NY (42)
 WI (42)
 DC (41)
 MI (41)
 WV (41)
 TN (40)
 CT (39)
 MA (39)
 KY (37)
 RI (37)
 SC (37)
 GA (34)
 ME (33)
 NH (33)
 VT (33)
 AL (27)
 FL (25)
 MS (22)
 Quebec (19)
 Nova Scotia (18)
 New Brunswick (13)
 Prince Edward Island (13)
 Western (10)
 Newfoundland and Labrador (3)
Thorax, front leg, coxa, presence of a spine near where coxa joins trochanter, spine points back towards abdomen - note this spine is almost always large, but cloaked in hairs and can be difficult to see, if in doubt use a pin to confirm that a spine is there
 No spine - the majority of species (51)
 Long spine about 1/3 or more the length of the coxa (12)
 Short triangular spine less than 1/4 the length of the coxa (10)
Thorax, mesepisternum, the plate below front wing, PRIMARY color
 Red (40)
 Yellow (21)
 Black (20)
Thorax, propodeum, rear face, PRIMARY color
 Black (36)
 Red (31)
 Yellow (20)
Thorax, scutellum, PRIMARY color
 Yellow (33)
 Red (32)
 Black (6)
 White (3)
Thorax, scutum, PRIMARY color
 Red (39)
 Black (33)
Thorax, scutum, presence of any yellow
 Yellow absent (54)
 Yellow present (19)
Time of year
 June - July (45)
 May or earlier (40)
 August or later (14)
Wing, Submarginal Cells, Number - CAREFUL, almost any species can drop one of the cross veins. a true 2 submarginal cell species has the cells almost equally wide
 3 (69)
 2 (2)
zz Secret Shortcuts - use at your own peril
 Others (52)
 Striped (14)
 Redhaired (7)
 White setae (7)