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Discover Life 18 kinds match:
Nomia angustitibialis  [popup] female
Nomia angustitibialis  [popup] male
Nomia fedorensis  [popup] female
Nomia fedorensis  [popup] male
Nomia foxii  [popup] female
Nomia foxii  [popup] male
Nomia howardi  [popup] female
Nomia howardi  [popup] male
Nomia maneei  [popup] female
Nomia maneei  [popup] male
Nomia melanderi  [popup] female
Nomia melanderi  [popup] male
Nomia nortoni  [popup] female
Nomia nortoni  [popup] male
Nomia tetrazonata  [popup] female
Nomia tetrazonata  [popup] male
Nomia universitatis  [popup] female
Nomia universitatis  [popup] male


REMAINING (number with state)
Female, N. fedorensis vs N. maneei
 N. fedorensis - T2 flat or nearly so in the basal half, without a distinct transverse groove at the center although there may be very slight hints of one laterally (1)
 N. maneei - T2 with a clear transverse groove in the basal half, formed by its raised anterior face primarily, although you should be CAREFUL because sometimes this groove may be partially or entirely hidden beneath the rim of T1 (1)
Female, N. fedorensis vs N. tetrazonata and N. universitatis
 N. tetrazonata and N. universitatis - The pitting of T3 is largely about the same size as that of T2 with interpit spacing often approaching one pit diameter, if with any very small and dense pitting then this is only in the basal third to half of T3 - In direct comparison, the pitting of T4 is larger and only densely-spaced basally if at all - The transition between the pitting of the anterior and posterior areas of the scutum is more sudden in direct comparison, with the overall change in average pit interspacing greater than in N. fedorensis (2)
 N. fedorensis - The pitting of T3 is largely smaller than that of T2 with interpit spacing of clearly less than one pit diameter, this condition present up until the transversely-elevated portion of T3 which occurs directly basal to the apical impressed rim - In direct comparison, the pitting of T4 is smaller and denser than the others from the base up until just before the apical impressed rim - The transition between the pitting of the anterior and posterior areas of the scutum is more gradual in direct comparison, with the overall change in average pit interspacing less than in N. tetrazonata and N. universitatis (1)
Female, N. howardi vs N. melanderi - CAREFUL, these are two very similar species
 N. howardi - Apical greenish-white opalescent band on T1 is half or more the LONGITUDINAL length of the band on T2 - In direct comparison, the opalescent bend on the tergites occupies a smaller proportion of the longitudinal length of the depressed apical rim of the tergites with a subtly more gradual and smoothly rounded curve to the bent end of the outer tibial spur of the hindleg, this angle a tiny bit greater than 135 degrees (1)
 N. melanderi - Apical greenish-white opalescent band on T1 is clearly less than half the longitudinal length of the band on T2 - In direct comparison,the opalescent bend on the tergites occupies a greater proportion of the longitudinal length of hte depressed apical rim of the tergites with a subtly more sharper and less gradual curve to the bent end of the outer tibial spur of the hindleg, this angle usually between 135 and 90 degrees (1)
Female, N. nortoni vs other species
 Other species - In direct comparison, scutum with pits in the rear half appearing deeper and pit-like, or if shallower in the rear half then still easily recognizable - Abdomen with only white or yellowish hairs present - Size variable, but other large species stop short of 15mm on average (7)
 N. nortoni - In direct comparison, scutum with pits in the rear half appearing extremely shallow and dimple-like, often to the point that they are nearly nonexistent - Abdomen with both light and dark hairs present, except in the Mexican subspecies N. nortoni cressoni - Very large, regularly reaching 17-20mm in length (1)
Female, N. tetrazonata vs N. universitatis - CAREFUL, these are two very close species which require reference material for positive identification
 N. tetrazonata - With finer, more weakly defined longitudinal striations near the top and middle of the metepisternum - Rear face of propodeum more sparsely pitted, often with many pit interspaces greater than their pit diameters - Propodeal rear face densely covered by shorter, suberect light hairs which at least partially obscure the surface as well as some longer, erect hairs sometimes - One pit size present on the rear face of the propodeum, although some slight variation may be present it is clear that there are not two different classes of pit size - Pitting of T4 usually smaller and more densely packed than on T2, although rarely the pitting on T4 may approach the size of the pits on T2 - According to Ribble, 1965, N. tetrazonata has wings measuring about 7mm in length - A Southwestern species, reaching no farther East than Texas and no farther North than Utah (1)
 N. universitatis - With coarser, more strongly defined longitudinal striations near the top and middle of the metepisternum - Rear face of propodeum more densely pitted, most pit interspaces no greater than half their pit diameters - Propodeal rear face sparsely covered with longer, erect light hairs that do not obscure the surface - Two pit sizes present on the rear face of propodeum, with much smaller pits hidden among the larger pits - Pitting of T4 about the same size and density as on T2, although sometimes parts of T4 are more sparsely pitted than on T2 - According to Ribble, 1965, N. universitatis has wings measuring about 9mm in length - Primarily thought to be a Midwestern species, although specimens have been found in New Mexico and one specimen has been determined from California (1)
Female, T1, presence or absence of iridescent bands at the apical rim
 Band entirely absent, with no traces even at the far sides (7)
 Band present but interrupted, sometimes appearing only as small marks at the lateral sides (2)
 Complete band present (2)
Female, abdomen, T1, average interpit distance in the basal area between the anterior face and the apically impressed rim
 About one pit or less (5)
 More than one pit diameter, but not more than two (5)
 More than two pits (4)
Female, abdomen, pitting on T2 in comparison to T3
 Pitting only slightly smaller and more closely spaced on T3 than on T2, if at all (5)
 Pitting about the same size on T2 and T3, although pitting is more sparse on T3 (4)
 Pitting much smaller and more closely spaced on T3 than on T2 (3)
Female, midleg, tibial spur serration - Note serrations are small best seen at greater than 40X magnification
 Finely and evenly serrate throughout (4)
 Unevenly serrate with irregularly spaced, larger teeth in the apical third (3)
Female, thorax, scutellum, pitting
 Scutellum closely pitted, with many pits that are touching or nearly so (7)
 Scutellum almost entirely unpitted, with only a small number of pits in the middle of the segment, these pits with interspaces FAR greater than their own diameter (3)
Female, thorax, scutum, pitting in the central portion of the posterior half
 Pits very distinctly sparser in the posterior half than in the anterior half of the scutum, the average spacing in the posterior half about two pit diameters or more (5)
 Pits dense to moderate in their spacing, the average spacing somewhere around one half to one pit diameter, with interspaces at time one pit diameter or greater (4)
 Pits dense and relatively uniform across the entire scutum, the average spacing being less than half a pit diameter, rarely if ever with any interspaces greater than the pit diameters, at least some pits touching one another in the center or the segment (2)
 Posterior half nearly entirely unpitted, standing in direct contrast to the closely pitted anterior rim (2)
Male, N. howardi vs N. melanderi - CAREFUL, these are two very similar species
 N. howardi - The apical greenish-white opalescent band on T1 is always present and clearly visible, neither thinned at the middle nor weakened in color in comparison to the other tergal bands - On S2, towards the base, submedially, are a pair of transverse clearly raised ridges, the inner tips of which are further produced into acutely pointed tips, often as sharply as sixty-degrees, although they are sometimes very slightly rounded at the very tip (1)
 N. melanderi - The apical greenish-white opalescent band on T1 is highly variable, ranging from its most common state in this species of being nearly absent to the less common state of being complete, but if complete it is reduced such that it is either weaker in coloration than the bands elsewhere on the abdomen or thinned medially - On S2, towards the base, submedially, are a pair of transverse clearly raised ridges, the inner tips of which are further produced into a strongly rounded over vaguely right angle or curve, usually with the tips are so strongly rounded over that discerning an exact angle is problematic (1)
Male, N. tetrazonata vs N. universitatis
 N. tetrazonata - With a strongly-defined transverse groove found basally on T2, anteriorly this groove is delimited by a steep, near-vertical edge which lies just below the rim of T1 this groove and edge more or equally defined as the the basal limit of the apically impressed rim of T2 - Hind basitarsal integumental color nearly entirely dark brownish, if with any pale integument then it is only at the base - In direct comparison, smaller, about 9-11mm (1)
 N. universitatis - Groove of T2 so shallow as to be hardly noticable if at all with no sharply defined anterior edge, often appearing nearly flat, clearly less defined than the basal limit of the apically impressed rim of T2 - Hind basitarsal integumental color nearly entirely a light orangish to amber color - In direct comparison, larger, about 12-14mm (1)
Male, T1, presence or absence of iridescent bands at the apical rim
 Band entirely absent, with no traces even at the far sides (8)
 Band present but interrupted, sometimes appearing only as small marks at the lateral sides (2)
 Complete band present (2)
Male, abdomen, S3, longitudinal length of light hair patches near middle of segment, which border the rim of S3 and extend varying lengths inward, usually becoming less dense but still noticeable, not measuring at the lateral sides where they are usually significantly longer - CAREFUL, as the patches may become faint basally
 Hair patches SHORT, taking up clearly less than half the length of S3 (7)
 Hair patches LONG, taking up half or more the length of S3 (5)
Male, head, antennal color
 Clearly and brightly yellow or orangish on the underside, creating a strong contrast with the brown coloration of the upper surface (8)
 Dark on the underside, brownish but sometimes with a slightly dark RED tinge, while dark in coloration it is still somewhat lighter than the upper surface and lacks the orange yellow high contrast component of the other species (5)
Male, head, clypeus, pitting
 Pitting present in the apical half (7)
 Pitting absent in at least the apical half, surface tessellated at most (3)
Male, head, mandible, dentation
 Simple, without a subapical tooth (5)
 With a clear downward pointing subapical tooth located on the LOWER, outside margin of the mandible, well away from the tip of the mandible, in contrast to the usual placement of an extra tooth along the interior or upper edge of the mandible as found in other Halictidae (4)
Male, head, position of lateral ocelli
 Nearer to vertex margin than eyes (7)
 Nearer to eyes than vertex margin (4)
 Roughly the same distance from the eyes and vertex margin (4)
Male, hindleg, basitarsal integumental color
 Entirely light or very nearly so, yellow to off-white, clearly lighter than the hindfemur (7)
 Dark, brown to reddish-brown, about equal to the hindfemur in coloration, although sometimes there may be a SMALL amount of pale integument near the base (4)
Male, hindleg, tibia, outer face of the apical end - Note that the more produced the tibie end becomes the more yellow and less hairy the produced tip is
 Moderately produced, the greatest width equal to approximately the length of the tibia to slightly less, with ONE distinct tip near the apex of the tibia which has about half or more of its width lightly colored, this tip narrow and acutely angular (3)
 Weakly produced, the greatest width equal to about half the total length of the tibia or less, tibia appearing merely thickened or cuneate apically and with only very slight lightening of the integument near the tip if at all, its maximum width near (3)
 Strongly produced, the greatest width equal to more than the length of the tibia, with a bulbous tip that appears more rounded than angular (2)
 Moderately produced, the greatest width equal to approximately the length of the tibia to slightly less, the tip of the produced end squared off with TWO distinct corners, the integument only slightly lightened and orangish at the tip (1)
 Strongly produced, the greatest width equal to more than the length of the tibia, with a bulbous tip that appears more rounded than angular, UNIQUE is weakly-defined ridge running along the projection but petering out before the tip (1)
N. angustitibialis vs other species
 Other species - Female tessellation variable, but never as strong as is seen in N. angustitibialis, if tessellated on T1 then the integument in the rear half of the scutum does not resemble fine sandpaper or the pitting here is more sparse than one pit diameter interspacing on average - Male clypeus variable, often convexly rounded and jutting medially, but never with a medial sharp and acute triangular projection (15)
 N. angustitibialis - Females may be told from other species by their very dull integument, this best viewed on T1 where it appears very densely tessellated and similar in appearance to fine sandpaper, this also occurring in the rear half of the scutum where the pitting is very dense, averaging much less than a pit diameter in terms of interpit distance - Males with a prominent, acute, very sharp and strongly-produced narrow spike-like medial projection jutting from the rim of the clypeus (2)
Sex, number of antennal segments
 Female, 12 (9)
 Male, 13 (9)
State or province where bee was collected
 AZ (12)
 NM (12)
 TX (10)
 CO (8)
 UT (8)
 CA (6)
 KS (6)
 NV (6)
 OK (6)
 AL (4)
 FL (4)
 GA (4)
 MS (4)
 NC (4)
 NE (4)
 SC (4)
 SD (4)
 TN (4)
 AR (2)
 DC (2)
 DE (2)
 IA (2)
 ID (2)
 IL (2)
 IN (2)
 KY (2)
 LA (2)
 MD (2)
 MN (2)
 MO (2)
 MT (2)
 ND (2)
 NJ (2)
 NY (2)
 OH (2)
 OR (2)
 PA (2)
 VA (2)
 WA (2)
 WV (2)
 WY (2)