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Agapostemon sericeus (Forster, 1771)
Apis sericea Forster, 1771; Halictus radiatus Say, 1837; Agapostemon pulchra Smith, 1853; Agapostemon sulcatulus Cockerell, 1909; Agapostemon radiatus (Say, 1837)

Life   Insecta   Hymenoptera   Apoidea   Halictidae   Agapostemon
Subgenus: Agapostemon

Agapostemon sericeus, male PaDIL, www.padil.gov
Laurence Packer · 9
Agapostemon sericeus, male PaDIL, www.padil.gov

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Agapostemon sericeus, PaDIL, www.padil.gov.au
Laurence Packer · 9
Agapostemon sericeus, PaDIL, www.padil.gov.au
Agapostemon sericeus MALE mm .x f
© Copyright Laurence Packer 2014 · 7
Agapostemon sericeus MALE mm .x f

Agapostemon sericeus Female-small
© Copyright Laurence Packer 2014 · 7
Agapostemon sericeus Female-small
Agapostemon sericeus Female
© Copyright Laurence Packer 2014 · 7
Agapostemon sericeus Female

Agapostemon sericeus Male
© Copyright Laurence Packer 2014 · 7
Agapostemon sericeus Male
Agapostemon sericeus FEM mm .x f
© Copyright Laurence Packer 2014 · 7
Agapostemon sericeus FEM mm .x f

Agapostemon sericeus
© Copyright John Ascher, 2006-2014 · 6
Agapostemon sericeus
Agapostemon sericeus
© Copyright John Ascher, 2006-2014 · 6
Agapostemon sericeus

Agapostemon sericeus, F, Back, MD, PG County ---.. ZS PMax
© Copyright source/photographer · 5
Agapostemon sericeus, F, Back, MD, PG County ---.. ZS PMax
Agapostemon sericeus, F, Face, MD, PG County ---.. ZS PMax
© Copyright source/photographer · 5
Agapostemon sericeus, F, Face, MD, PG County ---.. ZS PMax

Agapostemon sericeus, F, Side, MD, PG County ---.. ZS PMax
© Copyright source/photographer · 5
Agapostemon sericeus, F, Side, MD, PG County ---.. ZS PMax
Agapostemon sericeus, f, face, Pr. Georges Co., MD ---.
© Copyright source/photographer · 5
Agapostemon sericeus, f, face, Pr. Georges Co., MD ---.

Agapostemon sericeus, M, back, Pr. Georges Co., Maryland ---.
© Copyright source/photographer · 5
Agapostemon sericeus, M, back, Pr. Georges Co., Maryland ---.
Agapostemon sericeus, M, face, Pr. Georges Co., Maryland ---.. ZS PMax
© Copyright source/photographer · 5
Agapostemon sericeus, M, face, Pr. Georges Co., Maryland ---.. ZS PMax
Identification
Extracted from: Roberts, 1972. REVISION OF THE BEE GENUS AGAPOSTEMON. Agricultural Experimental Station. The University of Kansas. Halictus radiatus Say 1837. Type probably destroyed.

Agapostemon pulchra Smith 1853. Type $ , British Museum (Natural History).

Agapostemon sitlcatulits Cockerell 1909. Type $ , U.S. National Museum.

The type of Halictus radiatus has probably been destroyed, but the
description leaves no doubt of its identity. Michener has examined the
type of Agapostemon pulchra (which is not labeled "California" as reported
by Sandhouse, 1936) and I have examined the type of Agapostemon sul-
catulus.

Distribution (Fig. 18). Specimens have been collected as far north as
Treesbank, Manitoba; as far south as Orange Co. in central Florida; as
far east as Cape Cod, Massachusetts; and as far west as Sioux Co., Nebraska.
In the northern part of the range (Wisconsin) females have been collected
from April through October and males from July through October. In the
central part of its range (Kansas)- females have been collected from April
through November and males in April and July through November. In the
southern part of its range females have been collected from April through
September and males from June through August and in October. Most
abundant at elevations of less than 2,000 ft. (610 m), A. radiatus has been
collected as high as 4,100 ft. (1,250 m) in the Smoky Mountains of North
Carolina.

Diagnosis. The male may be distinguished from many species by the
yellow maculations on its 6th metasomal sternum and by the tooth on its
hind femur; from A. mellwentris by the brown-black on the anterior surface
of its first metasomal tergum; from A. texanus and A. angelicus by its lack
of conspicuous metallic tints on metasomal tergum 4, and by its lack of a
broad, subapical, transverse ridge on metasomal sternum 4; and from males
of A. splendens, A. cocherelli and A. femoratus by its unmodified hind
basitarsus. The female may be distinguished from many species by its
metallic green metasomal terga; from A. texanus and A. angelicus by its
coarsely punctate or rugose mesoscutum without punctures of two distinct
sizes; from A. splendens by its smaller size, coarse parallel carinae dorso-
medially on its propodeum, its bright yellow mandibles (ferruginous
apically), and its very pale amber to clear wings; from A. femoratus by its
mesoscutum (coarsely punctate with rugae anteriorly and laterally in A.
radiatus, almost entirely coarsely rugose in A. femoratus). The female can-
not be morphologically differentiated from females of A. cocherelli but may
be distinguished by its eastern distribution.

Description

male (Figs. 105-106, 161)

General coloration of head and mesosoma bright metallic green to
blue-green, metasoma with black and yellow bands. Head (Figs. 105-106) : pubescence white, pale yellowish on interocular area, becoming pale amber
on vertex. (1) Labrum as in A. texanus. (2) Clypeits with large scattered
punctures below, becoming weakly rugose above. (3) Interocular area with
very deep, fine, contiguous punctures below vertex, becoming weakly and
finely rugose at level of and below antennal sockets; supraclypeal pro-
tuberance rugose. (4) Vertex finely and deeply punctate below ocelli and
laterally, becoming deeply rugulose behind and between ocelli. (5) Gena
with short, weak, parallel, well separated carinae extending postero-dorsally
from antero-ventral margin. (6) Malar area bright yellow; very short. (7)
Mandible bright yellow with apical x /^- x /i dark ferruginous. (8) Antenna
brown-black above with apical l / 2 of apical flagellomere amber; underside
of flagellum amber to pale amber; underside of scape and pedicel bright
yellow (underside of pedicel sometimes brown). Mesosoma: pubescence
white, becoming yellowish to fuliginous on mesonotum and metanotum.

(9) Pronotum with distinctly, but not acutely, angular lateral angle and
posterior lobe; distinct carina extending postero-ventrally from lateral angle;
distinct vertical carina laterally; and numerous weak horizontal carinulae.

(10) Mesoscutitm with fine, deep, contiguous punctures becoming rugose
antero-laterally. (11) Mesoscutelhtm with fine, deep, contiguous punctures
medially, becoming scattered in shiny lateral area. (12) Metanotum finely
but deeply rugulose. (13) Mesepi sternum moderately deeply and moderately
coarsely rugose anteriorly, becoming slightly less deeply and coarsely rugose
posteriorly. (14) Metepisternum moderately deeply and moderately coarsely
rugose. (15) Propodeum with strong propodeal carina; propodeal shield
moderately deeply and moderately coarsely rugose; dorsal area with short,
coarse, parallel carinae extending postero-laterally from anterior margin,
becoming moderately deeply and moderately coarsely rugose posteriorly
(entire dorsal area rugose on some specimens) ; coarsely rugose postero-
laterally, becoming punctate or finely rugulose antero-laterally. (16) Wing
very pale brown, slightly darker on distal margin; veins and pterostigma
pale brown, radial vein very dark brown. (17) Tegula amber with metallic
tints antero-basally, with yellow on posterior margin, and with yellow sub-
marginal band anteriorly. (18) Fore leg yellow; coxa metallic green and
with small brown stripe posteriorly on tibia; pubescence yellowish to amber.
(19) Middle leg with coloration and pubescence like fore leg with small,
brown, subapical spot dorsally on femur and with brown posterior stripe
on tibia larger. (20) Hind leg (Fig. 161) with coxa metallic green; tro-
chanter brown to amber with yellow on apical l / 2 of lower side (extending
to base on some specimens) ; femur yellow with brown spot dorsally at
apex and sometimes posteriorly at base (much smaller than apical spot);
tibia yellow with small brown to amber spot apically on anterior surface,
with brown stripe antero-dorsally often connected with brown basal spot; tarsus yellow, basitarsus lacking basal ridge and apical groove. Pubescence
yellowish to amber. Metasoma: (21) Terga black with yellow bands
on basal halves of terga 2-6 and centrally on tergum 1 ; ventro-lateral margins
of terga 1-6 transparent amber; and sometimes with faint metallic tints
anteriorly on tergum 1 and postero-laterally on tergum 3. Pubescence dor-
sally on terga 1-4 very short and inconspicuous, pale on yellow bands, dark
on brown bands; moderately long, yellowish pubescence anteriorly on tergum
1 and laterally on terga 1-4; moderately long and dark brown dorsally and
laterally on terga 5-7. (22) Sterna yellow with narrow brown band on distal
margin of sternum 2 pale and slightly broadened medially, becoming pro-
gressively darker and larger on sterna 3-5; sternum 6 with brown medial
stripe varying from very narrow to l / 2 width of sternum; sternum 1 metallic
green basally. Broad, low, transverse, subapical (not apical as in A. texantis
and A. angelicas) ridge on sternum 4, most prominent laterally, and often
with faint metallic tints medially; moderately long scattered hairs on ex-
posed areas, 2-4 large stout bristles disto-laterally on sternum 4. (23)
Genitalia indistinguishable from those of A. femoratus.

female (Figs. 55-56)

General coloration of head, mesosoma and metasoma bright metallic
green to blue-green. Head (Figs. 55-56): pubescence white, becoming
pale yellowish amber on vertex and, commonly, on interocular area. (1)
Labrum as in A. texanns. (2) Clypeus with punctures deep, scattered below,
becoming subcontiguous and interspersed with weak horizontal rugae above.
(3) Interocular area with coarse, deep, contiguous punctures dorso-medially,
becoming moderately rugose laterally and ventrally; supraclypeal pro-
tuberance sparsely punctate and with weak horizontal carinae. (4) Vertex
with coarse, deep, contiguous punctures anterior to ocelli, becoming more
shallowly punctate or finely rugulose laterally; shallowly and finely rugose
posteriorly and between ocelli. (5) Gena with moderate to coarse, contiguous,
parallel carinae extending postero-dorsally from antero-ventral margin. (6)
Malar area dark amber to dark brown; very short, nearly absent. (7) Man-
dible yellow with apical Yi-Vi dark ferruginous. (8) Antenna brown-black
with underside of flagellum very slightly paler than upperside. Meso-
soma: pubescence white, becoming slightly yellowish to fuliginous on
mesonotum and metanotum. (9) Pronotum as in $ . (10) Mesoscutum with
deep, contiguous, moderately large punctures becoming rugose anteriorly
and antero-laterally. (11) Mesoscutellum with small subcontiguous punc-
tures medially, becoming larger and scattered on shiny lateral area. (12)
Metanotum finely and shallowly rugulose. (13) Mesepisternum deeply and
coarsely rugose anteriorly, becoming slightly less coarsely and less deeply
rugose posteriorly. (14) Metepi sternum with even, parallel, horizontal carinae anastomosing posteriorly (on some specimens becoming rugose
posteriorly). (15) Propodeum with very strong and prominent propodeal
carina; propodeal shield weakly rugose (rugae often absent on upper
margin) ; dorsal surface with very coarse, irregular and anastomosing carinae
extending posteriorly from anterior margin; postero-lateral margin with
moderately coarse horizontal carinae, becoming much finer and weaker
antero-laterally. (16) Wing as in S . (17) Tegirfa as in $ but slightly
darker. (18-19) Fore and middle legs dark brown to brown-black with
coxae metallic green and with antero-dorsal pale amber to yellowish areas
apically on femora and basally on tibiae; pubescence white to pale fuliginous
or amber. (20) Hind leg dark brown to brown-black with metallic tints
dorsally on coxa; pubescence creamy, becoming amber posteriorly on tarsus
and dark brown to brown-black dorsally on tibia. Metasoma: (21)
Terga with very fine subcontiguous punctures on metallic regions; pubes-
cence white, becoming brown-black on terga 5-6; terga 2-4 with narrow
band of tomentum basally, otherwise largely devoid of hairs; moderately
long hairs anteriorly on tergum 1, laterally on terga 1-5, and dorsally on
terga 5-6. (22) Sterna brown to brown-black with metallic tints basally on
sternum 1 and some specimens with very weak metallic tints on sternum 4;
exposed areas with long, white, scattered hairs.


Names
Scientific source:

Supported by

Hosts · map
FamilyScientific name @ source (records)
Alismataceae  Sagittaria sp @ BBSL (1)
Anacardiaceae  Rhus copallina @ UCMS_ENT (13)
Asteraceae  Achillea millefolium @ UCMS_ENT (1)

Ageratina altissima @ PN- (1)

Aster sp @ UCMS_ENT (2)

Bidens sp @ BBSL (1)

Cichorium intybus @ MLSB__N16- (3); PN- (3)

Cirsium vulgare @ UCMS_ENT (1)

Conyza canadensis @ UCMS_ENT (1)

Erigeron philadelphicus @ AMNH_BEE (1)

Hieracium caespitosum @ UCMS_ENT (1)

Hypochaeris radicata @ UCMS_ENT (1)

Liatris pycnostachya @ BBSL (1)

Pluchea odorata @ UCMS_ENT (10)

Silphium perfoliatum @ BBSL (1)

Solidago rugosa @ UCMS_ENT (1)

Solidago sempervirens @ UCMS_ENT (1)

Solidago tenuifolia @ UCMS_ENT (1)

Taraxacum officinale @ AMNH_BEE (1)
Brassicaceae  Sisymbrium officinale @ UCMS_ENT (1)
Convolvulaceae  Convolvulus sepium @ AMNH_BEE (2)
Ericaceae  Calluna vulgaris @ UCMS_ENT (9)

Rhododendron @ AMNH_BEE (1)

Vaccinium corymbosum @ UCMS_ENT (1)
Fabaceae  Medicago sativa @ BBSL (2)

Melilotus officinalis @ UCMS_ENT (4)

Trifolium pratense @ PN- (1)

Trifolium repens @ MLSB__N16- (1)

Vicia cracca @ UCMS_ENT (1)
Grossulariaceae  Ribes missouriense @ AMNH_BEE (1)
Lamiaceae  Nepeta cataria @ AMNH_BEE (1); UCMS_ENT (5)

Physostegia parviflora @ AMNH_BEE (2)
Lythraceae  Lythrum salicaria @ UCMS_ENT (4)
Oleaceae  Syringa vulgaris @ AMNH_BEE (3)
Onagraceae  Oenothera biennis @ I_JSA (1)
Oxalidaceae  Oxalis stricta @ AMNH_BEE (1)
Polygonaceae  Persicaria bungeana @ UCMS_ENT (1)
Ranunculaceae  Aquilegia canadensis @ AMNH_BEE (1)

Ranunculus bulbosus @ UCMS_ENT (1)

Ranunculus sp @ UCMS_ENT (2)
Rosaceae  Malus pumila @ UCMS_ENT (11)

Malus @ AMNH_BEE (1)

Photinia melanocarpa @ UCMS_ENT (1)

Prunus sp @ UCMS_ENT (2)

Rosa @ AMNH_BEE (2)

Rubus flagellaris @ UCMS_ENT (2)

Rubus @ UCMS_ENT (1)
Salicaceae  Salix @ AMNH_BEE (3)
Solanaceae  Physalis philadelphica @ AMNH_BEE (1); UCMS_ENT (1)
_  Asteraceae @ I_JSA (1)

M Spring @ PN- (4)

apple @ NLA (1)

bee @ I_HRG (1)

blueberry @ NLA (1)

caneberry @ NLA (51)

cucurbit @ NLA (10)

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