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Aquilegia canadensis L.
RED COLUMBINE
Eastern red columbine

Life   Plantae   Dicotyledoneae   Ranunculaceae   Aquilegia

Aquilegia canadensis, Red Columbine
© John Pickering, 2004-2017 · 10
Aquilegia canadensis, Red Columbine

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Aquilegia canadensis, Red Columbine
© John Pickering, 2004-2017 · 8
Aquilegia canadensis, Red Columbine
Aquilegia canadensis
© Les Mehrhoff, 2008-2010 · 7
Aquilegia canadensis

Aquilegia canadensis, Red Columbine
© John Pickering, 2004-2017 · 6
Aquilegia canadensis, Red Columbine
Aquilegia canadensis, Red Columbine
© John Pickering, 2004-2017 · 5
Aquilegia canadensis, Red Columbine

Aquilegia canadensis, Red Columbine
© John Pickering, 2004-2017 · 5
Aquilegia canadensis, Red Columbine
Aquilegia canadensis, Red Columbine
© John Pickering, 2004-2017 · 5
Aquilegia canadensis, Red Columbine

Aquilegia canadensis
© Les Mehrhoff, 2008-2010 · 5
Aquilegia canadensis
Aquilegia canadensis
© Les Mehrhoff, 2008-2010 · 5
Aquilegia canadensis

Aquilegia canadensis, Red Columbine
© John Pickering, 2004-2017 · 4
Aquilegia canadensis, Red Columbine
Aquilegia canadensis, whole plant - in flower - general view
© Copyright Steve Baskauf, 2002-2011 · 4
Aquilegia canadensis, whole plant - in flower - general view

Aquilegia canadensis, leaf - on upper stem
© Copyright Steve Baskauf, 2002-2011 · 4
Aquilegia canadensis, leaf - on upper stem
Aquilegia canadensis, stem - showing leaf bases
© Copyright Steve Baskauf, 2002-2011 · 4
Aquilegia canadensis, stem - showing leaf bases

Aquilegia canadensis, inflorescence - lateral view of flower
© Copyright Steve Baskauf, 2002-2011 · 4
Aquilegia canadensis, inflorescence - lateral view of flower
Aquilegia canadensis, fruit - lateral or general close-up
© Copyright Steve Baskauf, 2002-2011 · 4
Aquilegia canadensis, fruit - lateral or general close-up

Associates · map
FamilyScientific name @ source (records)
Aphididae  Aphis ( @ NCSU_ENT (1)

Longicaudus trirhodus @ NCSU_ENT (4)
Botryosphaeriaceae  Phyllosticta aquilegiae @ BPI (1)

Phyllosticta @ BPI (1)
Dothioraceae  Metasphaeria @ BPI (1)
Erysiphaceae  Erysiphe cichoracearum @ BPI (1)

Erysiphe communis @ BPI (1)

Erysiphe polygoni @ BPI (11)

Sphaerotheca humuli @ BPI (1)
Halictidae  Agapostemon sericeus @ AMNH_BEE (1)
Mycosphaerellaceae  Cercospora aquilegiae @ BPI (3)

Septoria aquilegiae @ BPI (9)

Septoria longispora @ BPI (1)
Pucciniaceae  Puccinia rubigo-vera @ BPI (1)
Uropyxidaceae  Aecidium dakotense @ BPI (1)

Tranzschelia pruni-spinosae @ BPI (1)

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Following modified from Delaware Wildflowers
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Delaware Wildflowers  •  Scientific names

Aquilegia canadensis L. Wild Columbine
Ranunculaceae — Buttercup family
Rare native
Aquilegia canadensis
Choptank Mills
May 2004 Aquilegia canadensis Aquilegia canadensis
Laurels Preserve (PA)
May 2011

More information on this plant, from other sources.


Copyright David G. Smith

Delaware Wildflowers main page

Following modified from MissouriPlants.com
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Aquilegia canadensis L.

Aquilegia canadensis plant

Family - Ranunculaceae

Stems - To +60cm tall, multiple from base, branching above, red to green, herbaceous, thin, glabrous to glandular pubescent in upper portions, sparsely pilose below.

Leaves - Basal leaves on long petioles, biternate. Petioles to +10cm long, sparse pilose to glabrous. Cauline leaves becoming sessile above. Leaflets lobed, deep green and glabrous above, glaucous below with some pubescence near base or not. Ultimate divisions obtuse at apex, with main veins coming together at apex forming tiny white tip.

Aquilegia canadensis leaf

Inflorescence - Single flowers from leaf axils on long peduncles, nodding.

Flowers - Petals 5, spurred, yellowish at tip red for rest of length, +/-4cm long, expanded upper lip to 7mm broad. Sepals 5, reddish, yellow at apex, alternating with petals, to 2cm long, lanceolate. Stamens +20, of different lengths, those closer to pistil longer than outer. Filaments to +1.7cm long, flattened and expanded at base, glabrous. Anthers yellow, 2mm long and broad. Styles to 1.3cm long, filiform, glabrous. Ovaries 4, 5mm long, tomentose, pale yellow-green.

Aquilegia canadensis flower

Fruit - Follicles to 3cm long, beaked.

Flowering - April - July.

Habitat - Rocky ledges, rocky slopes, low woods. Also cultivated.

Origin - Native to U.S.

Other info. - The spurs of the petals contain nectaries and are very attractive to insects equipped with long proboscises. This and other species of Aquilegia are highly cultivated and easy to grow.
In Italian "Aquila" means "Eagle" and indeed the genus is so named because of the talon shaped spurs of the petals.
Steyermark lists two forms for the plant in Missouri. Form canadensis , (pictured above), has the typical red and yellow corolla. Form flaviflora (Tenny) Britt. has a corolla which is completely yellow. This form is rare. Some cultivated forms have white or pink corollas and can be double flowered also.

Photographs taken in the Hercules Glade Wilderness, Mark Twain National Forest, Taney County, MO., 4-28-00.


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Following modified from Plants Database, United States Department of Agriculture
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http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=AQCA ---> https://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=AQCA
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Following modified from Flora of North America
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FNA | Family List | FNA Vol. 3 | Ranunculaceae | Aquilegia

21. Aquilegia canadensis Linnaeus, Sp. Pl. 1: 533-534. 1753.

Canadian columbine, ancolie du Canada

Aquilegia australis Small; A . canadensis var. australis (Small) Munz; A . canadensis var. coccinea (Small) Munz; A . canadensis var. eminens (Greene) B. Boivin; A . canadensis var. latiuscula (Greene) Munz; A . coccinea Small

Stems 15-90 cm. Basal leaves 2×-ternately compound, 7-30 cm, much shorter than stems; leaflets green adaxially, 17-52 mm, not viscid; primary petiolules 17-93 mm (leaflets not crowded), glabrous or pilose, sometimes somewhat viscid. Flowers pendent; sepals divergent from floral axis, red or apex green, lance-ovate to oblong-ovate, 8-18 × 3-8 mm, apex broadly acute to acuminate; petals: spurs red, straight, ± parallel to divergent, 13-25 mm, stout (at least proximally), abruptly narrowed near middle, blades pale yellow or yellow-green, oblong to rounded, 5-9 × 4-8 mm; stamens 15-23 mm. Follicles 15-31 mm; beak 10-18 mm. 2 n = 14.

Flowering spring-summer (Mar-Jun). Shaded or open woods, often around cliffs, rock outcrops, and forest edges; 0-1600 m; Man., Ont., Que., Sask.; Ala., Ark., Conn., Del., Fla., Ga., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kans., Ky., Maine, Md., Mass., Mich., Minn., Mo., Nebr., N.H., N.J., N.Y., N.C., N.Dak., Ohio, Okla., Pa., R.I., S.C., S.Dak., Tenn., Tex., Vt., Va., W.Va., Wis.

P. A. Munz divided this species into five varieties, based on size of the plants, sepals, and leaflets and whether the leaves are 2-3×-ternately compound. The variation in size of these organs is not discontinuous or even bimodal, however, and I have not seen any material with 3×-ternately compound leaves. For this reason, no varieties are recognized here. The name Aquilegia canadensis var. hybrida Hooker has been misapplied to this species; the type specimen actually belongs to A . brevistyla (B. Boivin 1953).

Aquilegia canadensis has also been reported from New Brunswick, but the specimen has been destroyed and the species has never been recollected in the province.

Native Americans prepare infusions from various parts of plants of Aquilegia canadensis to treat heart trouble, kidney problems, headaches, bladder problems, and fever, and as a wash for poison ivy; pulverized seeds were used as love charms; and a compound was used to detect bewitchment (D. E. Moerman 1986).

Following modified from CalPhotos
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http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?query_src=dl&where-taxon=Aquilegia+canadensis&where-lifeform=specimen_tag&rel-lifeform=ne&rel-taxon=begins+with&where-lifeform=Plant ---> https://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?query_src=dl&where-taxon=Aquilegia+canadensis&where-lifeform=specimen_tag&rel-lifeform=ne&rel-taxon=begins+with&where-lifeform=Plant
&pull 20q v4.662 20091102: Error 501 Protocol scheme 'https' is not supported (LWP::Protocol::https not installed) https://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?query_src=dl&where-taxon=Aquilegia+canadensis&where-lifeform=specimen_tag&rel-lifeform=ne&rel-taxon=begins+with&where-lifeform=Plant

Updated: 2018-04-19 22:01:22 gmt
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