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Epeolus bifasciatus Cresson, 1864
Trophocleptria bifasciata (Cresson, 1864)

Life   Insecta   Hymenoptera   Apoidea   Apidae   Epeolus
Subgenus: None

Epeolus bifasciatus
© Copyright Hadel Go 2014 · 9
Epeolus bifasciatus

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Epeolus bifasciatus
© Copyright Hadel Go 2014 · 9
Epeolus bifasciatus
Epeolus bifasciatus
© Copyright Hadel Go 2014 · 8
Epeolus bifasciatus

Epeolus bifasciatus MALE CFP
© Copyright Laurence Packer 2014 · 7
Epeolus bifasciatus MALE CFP
Epeolus bifasciatus, F, Back, SD, Pennington County ---.. ZS PMax
© Copyright source/photographer · 5
Epeolus bifasciatus, F, Back, SD, Pennington County ---.. ZS PMax

Epeolus bifasciatus, F, Face, SD, Pennington County ---.. ZS PMax
© Copyright source/photographer · 5
Epeolus bifasciatus, F, Face, SD, Pennington County ---.. ZS PMax
Epeolus bifasciatus, F, Side, SD, Pennington County ---.. ZS PMax
© Copyright source/photographer · 5
Epeolus bifasciatus, F, Side, SD, Pennington County ---.. ZS PMax

Epeolus bifasciatus, F mm Xb-comp
Thomas Onuferko · 5
Epeolus bifasciatus, F mm Xb-comp
Epeolus bifasciatus, mm X
Thomas Onuferko · 5
Epeolus bifasciatus, mm X

Epeolus bifasciatus, mm Xb
Thomas Onuferko · 5
Epeolus bifasciatus, mm Xb
Epeolus bifasciatus, F mm X-comp
Thomas Onuferko · 5
Epeolus bifasciatus, F mm X-comp

Epeolus bifasciatus, F mm X-comp
Thomas Onuferko · 5
Epeolus bifasciatus, F mm X-comp
Epeolus bifasciatus, mm Xe
Thomas Onuferko · 5
Epeolus bifasciatus, mm Xe

Epeolus bifasciatus, mm Xe
Thomas Onuferko · 5
Epeolus bifasciatus, mm Xe
Epeolus bifasciatus, Cuckoo Bee
© Copyright Sheryl Pollock 2011 · 5
Epeolus bifasciatus, Cuckoo Bee
Overview
Extracted with permission from: Onuferko, T.M. 2017. Cleptoparasitic Bees of the Genus Epeolus Latreille (Hymenoptera: Apidae) in Canada. Canadian Journal of Arthropod Identification No. 30: March 30, 2017. doi:10.3752/cjai.2017.30

http://cjai.biologicalsurvey.ca/o_30/o_30.html

Diagnosis. Epeolus bifasciatus is unmistakeable among Canadian species of the genus, and both sexes can be readily identified by each of the following features that is diagnostic for the species in Canada: frontal area with pair of conspicuous granulose protrusions, each located near upper mesal margin of compound eye; punctures dense, but those of head and mesosoma sparser in some areas, larger, deep, and distinct; dorsal surface of pronotum long and distinctly angulate on anterior margin; mesoscutum without pale tomentum; and bright yellow tomentum on dorsal surface of mesosoma and metasoma.

Distribution in Canada: Central Canada (Map 4).

Reprinted with permission from: Mitchell, T.B. 1962 Bees of the Eastern United States. North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station Technical Bulletin No. 152.

FEMALE—Length 7-8 mm.; black, basal segments of antennae testaceous, segments 2 and beyond of flagellum more brownish-piceous; mandibles and labrum more reddish; legs testaceous, hind spurs piceous, mid spurs somewhat darker, the front spurs pale testaceous; pronotum, tubercles, tegulae, scutellum and axillae reddish-testaceous, and disc of basal abdominal tergum more or less red beneath the tomentum; lateral ocelli separated from margin of vertex by a space somewhat greater than their diameter; cheeks very narrow, hind margin carinate, strongly narrowed below; median length of labrum slightly less than basal width, apical tubercles very low and inconspicuous; inner margin of mandibles with a very low and inconspicuous, submedian angle; scutellum rather evenly rounded posteriorly, axillae robust, tips rather strongly divergent from sides of scutellum, lateral margins subcarinate (fig. 110); wings with the usual three submarginal cells, quite deeply infuscated, veins brownish-piceous; pubescence in general very short and inconspicuous, venter of thorax with a small amount of dense, white tomentum along mid-line; pronotum densely covered with bright yellow, appressed tomentum; disc of basal abdominal tergum largely covered with dense yellow tomentum, and tergum 2 yellow tomentose across the apical impressed area, the more apical terga not fasciate; a dense, transverse band of cream- colored tomentum on metanotum just below scutellum; punctures quite fine and close but deep and quite distinct on head, densely crowded between lateral ocelli and top of each eye, but with a conspicuous, impunctate elevation just below this, adjacent to eye margin; pleural punctures very coarse, deep and well separated or sparse below, becoming quite close above, those on scutum quite regularly distributed, coarse and close, becoming somewhat coarser posteriorly, those on scutellum very coarse but rather shallow, as those on axillae; punctures of abdominal terga rather fine but very close, deep and distinct, becoming somewhat finer on impressed, apical areas, tegulae with very fine, close punctures along inner side, these disappearing toward outer margin; pseudopygidium very short but quite broad across apical margin of tergum 5.


MALE—Resembles female in all respects other than the sexual differences. The pygidium is rather broadly sub-truncate, quite coarsely and closely punctate, the margin cannate.

DISTRIBUTION — Northern Mexico, Colorado and Minnesota, to the New England states and Florida; February to April in Florida, June to September in the North.

FLOWER RECORDS — Asclepias, Cirsium, Coreopsis, Erigeron, Helianthus, Melilotus, Nepeta, Rudbeckia and Vernonia. Robertson (1929) records bifasciatus also on Aster, Bidens, Boltonia, Dianthera, Eryngium, Eupatorium, Heliopsis, Lepachys, Lythrum, Petalostemum, Pycnanthemum, Solidago, Trifolium, Verbena and Verbesina.

HOST—Probably Colletes latitarsis.


Kinds
E. bifasciatus exhibits juch color variation throughout its range in North America. Populations from the Midwest and Northeast, where it is common, generally have BLACK legs, labrum, clypeus, p ropodeum, and pygidium. Peripheral populations in the Southeast are usually dark, burnt red in t he above mentioned characters, whereas populations from the Southwest tend to be reddish orange.

Identification
Species of the subgenus Trophocleptaria are recognizable by their unusually wide pronotum, which, at the mid point, is twice an ocellar width.

Names
Scientific source:

Supported by

Hosts · map
FamilyScientific name @ source (records)
Apiaceae  Daucus carota @ CUIC_ENT (1)
Asteraceae  Rudbeckia hirta @ CUIC_ENT (1)

Solidago @ CUIC_ENT (2)
Fabaceae  Melilotus officinalis @ CUIC_ENT (1)
Lamiaceae  Pycnanthemum @ I_HHGA (3)

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Updated: 2017-12-13 00:38:30 gmt
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