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Nomada illinoensis Robertson, 1900
Life   Insecta   Hymenoptera   Apoidea   Apidae   Nomada
Subgenus: None

Nomada illinoensis, female AMNH BEE00244857-3
© Copyright Hadel Go 2014 · 9
Nomada illinoensis, female AMNH BEE00244857-3

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    Unpublished synonymy: Nomada capillata – male - Holotype seen at MCZ in April of 2006. The type matches in all characteristics of size and coloration with that of N. illinoensis. The only difference is that the scutellum instead of being red has two interior patches of yellowish dots that fade to orange around the edges. I have not seen any other specimens that match and believe this type to be only a slightly different specimen of this species. Unpublished synonymy: Nomada minima - male - Holotype seen at the MCZ in April of 2006. This species has all the characteristics of a small male illinoense. I have a series of specimens that matches. Antenna and coloration do not match parva.
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Nomada illinoensis, female AMNH BEE00244857-1
© Copyright Hadel Go 2014 · 7
Nomada illinoensis, female AMNH BEE00244857-1
Nomada illinoensis, female AMNH BEE00244857-2
© Copyright Hadel Go 2014 · 7
Nomada illinoensis, female AMNH BEE00244857-2

Nomada illinoensis, male AMNH BEE00149617-1
© Copyright Hadel Go 2014 · 7
Nomada illinoensis, male AMNH BEE00149617-1
Nomada illinoensis, male AMNH BEE00149617-2
© Copyright Hadel Go 2014 · 7
Nomada illinoensis, male AMNH BEE00149617-2

Nomada illinoensis Male
© Copyright Laurence Packer 2014 · 7
Nomada illinoensis Male
Nomada illinoensis, male AMNH BEE00149617-3
© Copyright Hadel Go 2014 · 6
Nomada illinoensis, male AMNH BEE00149617-3
Overview
Reprinted with permission from: Mitchell, T.B. 1962 Bees of the Eastern United States. North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station Technical Bulletin No. 152.

FEMALE—Length 6-7 mm.; lateral ocelli subequally distant from margin of vertex and each other; cheeks subequal to eyes in width, posterior margin obscurely subcarinate; longer side of basal segment of flagellum about equal to segment 2, median segments nearly broad as long; mandibles slender and simple apically; wings lightly infuscated, somewhat more deeply so at apex and in marginal cell, with the usual three submarginal cells, 2nd and 3rd subequal anteriorly, veins and stigma piceous, basal vein considerably basad transverse median; tegulae somewhat shining between fine, close punctures which become somewhat more widely separated laterally; posterior margin of scutellum quite deeply impressed; front coxae not spinose; apex of hind tibiae with two or three elongate, very fine, slender bristles; head reddish-testaceous in large part, very small areas of black between bases of antennae, between the ocelli, and along posterior margin of cheeks; antennae testaceous; thorax largely ferruginous, tubercles and tegulae more testaceous, scutum with a narrow, median, black line, and propodeum anteriorly and on median line, black; legs testaceous in general, femora somewhat darkened posteriorly, spurs pale yellow; abdominal terga chiefly pale ferruginous, tergum 2 with a pair of widely separated, rather large, yellow maculae laterally, tergum 3 with similar pair of smaller maculations, tergum 1 piceous basally and more narrowly along apical margin; vertex and face above antennae very coarsely rugoso-punctate, becoming much more finely so on supraclypeal area and clypeus, cheeks finely rugose below; scutum, scutellum and mesopleura quite coarsely rugose, propodeum much more finely and shallowly so, the triangle dull, rather smooth below, becoming irregularly striate above; discs of abdominal terga very finely, closely and quite distinctly punctate toward base, apical margins becoming broadly impunctate, tergum 1 impunctate laterally and basally, the more median punctures very obscure; pseudopygidium transverse, very short, forming the rather narrowly truncate, apical margin of tergum 5, densely covered with suberect, silvery tomentum; pubescence very short and thin, entirely pale, somewhat more copious on thorax laterally and beneath, very fine and obscure on abdomen dorsally, but becoming somewhat more distinct apically; sternal plates with a subapical row of very fine slender pale hairs, sternum 5 apically with lateral tufts of rather elongate, fuscous hairs that converge medially.


MALE—Length 5.5-6.5 mm.; lateral ocelli slightly nearer margin of vertex than to each other; cheeks slightly narrower than eyes, posterior margin not distinctly carinate; antennal scape only very slightly swollen, apex deeply excavated, completely enclosing pedicel, basal segment of flagellum much shorter than segment 2, median segments nearly as broad as long; mandibles slender and simple apically; wings subhyaline basally, becoming faintly infuscated apically and in marginal cell, with the usual three submarginal cells, 2nd and 3rd subequal anteriorly, veins and stigma testaceous, basal vein considerably basad of transverse median; tegulae shining between fine, close punctures; posterior margin of scutellum only very slightly impressed medially; front coxae not spinose; hind femora slender and unmodified; clypeus, labrum, mandibles and lateral facial maculations that extend very narrowly up margin of eye to level of antennae, and a very small yellow spot just posterior to base of mandible on cheeks below, bright yellow; face above margin of clypeus, vertex and cheeks black; antennal scape bright yellow anteriorly, reddish-piceous posteriorly, flagellum testaceous; pronotal tubercles yellow, the tegulae more testaceous, scutellum with a pair of very small, obscure, ferruginous spots, thorax otherwise black; coxae black in large part, legs otherwise chiefly testaceous, hind femora largely piceous, spurs pale yellow; abdominal terga reddish in large part, tergum 1 piceous basally, yellowish medially, becoming ferruginous on apical rim; abdominal terga 2-4 with lateral, yellow maculae that are rather widely separated medially, these more extensive on tergum 2, successively smaller on 3 and 4, discs of 5 and 6 rather broadly yellow medially, apical margins becoming rather broadly yellowish-hyaline; abdominal sterna testaceous in part, with more piceous, irregular infusions; vertex and face above antennae quite coarsely rugose, cheeks much more finely so below, lower half of face more finely and obscurely punctate, minutely and closely so on supraclypeal area and clypeus, very Sparsely so on maculated areas at each side of clypeus; scutum, scutellum and mesopleura very densely rugose, propodeum posteriorly somewhat more shallowly rugose, lateral faces becoming somewhat smoother but very dull and obscurely rugose; discs of abdominal terga very minutely and quite closely punctate toward base, punctures becoming very minute apically, but invading depressed apical margins nearly to rims, tergum 1 becoming impunctate laterally and basally; terga 5 and 6 with somewhat coarser, more distinct punctures apically; pubescence entirely pale, rather short but quite copious over head and thorax, somewhat hiding surface on lower half of face and on venter of thorax, very minute and obscure on abdominal terga, becoming somewhat more elongate apically, abdominal sterna with more elongate, sparse, straight hairs, sternum 6 somewhat more densely pubescent apically; median length of pygidial plate about equal to basal width, quite strongly narrowed apically, apex very narrowly incised, margins carinate, surface very finely, closely and obscurely punctate; exposed sternal plates unmodified, sternum 6 strongly narrowed to the narrowly rounded apex; sternum 8 with a slender apical process; gonocoxites of genital armature as shown (fig. 107).

DISTRIBUTION—Minnesota to Massachusetts, south to Georgia, March to June.

FLOWER RECORDS—Crataegus, Rubus and Senecio. Robertson (1929) records illinoensis on Amelanchier, Claytonia, Cornus, Dentaria, Fragaria, Heracleum, Krigia, Polytaenia, Prunus, Radicula, Ribes, Salix, Viburnum and Zanthoxylum.


Identification
Extracted from Western Bees obtained by the American Museum Expeditions by Cockerell (1921).

COLORADO; 19, Camp Creek Ranger Station in the :\ledicine Bow Range about 41 0 N., 1060 12' W., about 8700 ft. alt.} lodgepole pine and sagebrush, June 19, 1920. This is referred to illinoensis because it appears to agree with the Nebraska form so referred by Swenk, though it has the third antennal joint considerably longer than in what I had considered to be illinoensis, from Oklahoma. It appears legitimate, for the present, to interpret illinoensis in a rather broad sense, recognizing that when the sexes, habits, and genitalia are known, in all probability several valid species will be segregated.

Names
Scientific source:

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Hosts · map
FamilyScientific name @ source (records)
Ericaceae  Vaccinium @ AMNH_BEE (1)
Malvaceae  Malvastrum sp @ BBSL (1)
Rosaceae  Prunus sp @ BBSL (1)

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Updated: 2017-12-14 20:11:28 gmt
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