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Nomada vicinalis Cresson, 1878
Nomada vicinalis var infrarubens Cockerell, 1905; Nomada vicinalis infrarubens Cockerell, 1905, valid subspecies; Nomada (Nomada) vicinalis Cresson, 1878

Life   Insecta   Hymenoptera   Apoidea   Apidae   Nomada
Subgenus: None

Nomada vicinalis, female, back left bottom 2
© Copyright source/photographer · 9
Nomada vicinalis, female, back left bottom 2

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Nomada vicinalis, female, back left bottom
© Copyright source/photographer · 9
Nomada vicinalis, female, back left bottom
Nomada vicinalis, female, back
© Copyright source/photographer · 9
Nomada vicinalis, female, back

Nomada vicinalis, female, face
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Nomada vicinalis, female, face
Nomada vicinalis, female, front from backside
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Nomada vicinalis, female, front from backside

Nomada vicinalis, female, front right 2
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Nomada vicinalis, female, front right 2
Nomada vicinalis, female, front right
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Nomada vicinalis, female, front right

Nomada vicinalis, female, right side
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Nomada vicinalis, female, right side
Nomada vicinalis, female, top
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Nomada vicinalis, female, top
Overview
Reprinted from: Cresson, E.T., 1878. Descriptions of new North American Hymenoptera in the collection of the American Entomological Society. Trans. Am. Entomol. Soc.7:78-79.


Black, opaque; head and thorax densely and finely punctured and rather thickly clothed with short pale pubescence, tinged with yellowish on vertex and thorax above, on face and sides of thorax silvery sericeous; an emarginate line on sides of face, line beneath eyes, clypeus, labrum, base of mandibles, scape beneath, tubercles and spot beneath, yellow ; scape behind and spots on basal half of flagellum behind black; second joint of flagellum rather more than one-half the length of third; two narrow obscure stripes on mesothorax, scutellum and t?gu)a. ferruginous; scutellum subbilo bate, not prominent: wings narrowly fuscous on apical margin; legs ferrugi nous, posterior coxa and all the femora behind more or less black; abdomen smooth and shining ferruginous, basal half of first segment and spot on extreme AMERICAN HYMENOPTERA. 79 sides of the segments black ; a yellow band, more or less interrupted on middle on segments 1?6", broader and narrowed towards middle on second segment; enter ferruginous, spotted or banded with yellow. Length .40 inch. Hab.?Colorado, (Morrison). Two specimens. This may be only a variety of the preceding species.

Identification
Extracted from Western Bees obtained by the American Museum Expeditions by Cockerell (1921).

N omada vicinalis Cresson, variety infrarubens Cockerell
COLORADO: lif, Telluride, about 10,000 ft. alt., along Cornet Creek trail, July 9, 1919; 1 if, South Fork of Rio Grande between Pass and Hope Creeks, about 9300 ft. alt., June 18, 1919; 1 if, Electra Lake near Durango, about 8400 ft. alt., June 29, 1919. All of these localities are in forest regions. These agree with Cresson's description, except that the venter is ,vithout yellow, except a suffused spot near apex. The mesothorax appears wholly black, but in the Rio Grande and Telluride specimens it is possible to see a pair of very faint red lines. The scutellum has two red spots, but no yellow. The variety injrarubens was described from Oregon, but the Colorado specimens 'cannot be separated. On the other hand, I find that N. vicinalis aldrichi Cockerell, from Idaho, is distinct. Compared with aldrichi, the present insect differs by the shorter third antennal joint and the deep emargination of the black mark on first ventral segment. I think the Idaho insect must stand as N. aldrichi, a separate species. It is a comparatively large form.

Names
Scientific source:

Supported by

Hosts · map
FamilyScientific name @ source (records)
Aceraceae  Acer glabrum @ BBSL (2)
Apiaceae  Lomatium triternatum @ BBSL (1)
Boraginaceae  Hackelia patens @ BBSL (2)
Polycitoridae  Salix sp @ BBSL (1)
Rosaceae  Prunus virginiana @ BBSL (4)
Salicaceae  Salix @ AMNH_BEE (1)
Scrophulariaceae  Penstemon cyananthus @ BBSL (1)
_  Apiaceae sp @ BBSL (1)

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Updated: 2018-06-20 15:37:14 gmt
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