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Prionyx parkeri Bohart and Menke, 1963
Life   Insecta   Hymenoptera   Apoidea   Sphecidae   Prionyx
Subgenus: None

Prionyx parkeri
© Nathaniel S. Gross · 9
Prionyx parkeri

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Prionyx parkeri
© Thom Wilson of Baltimore City, MD, CityEcology@gmail.com · 9
Prionyx parkeri
Prionyx parkeri, female
© Eric R. Eaton · 9
Prionyx parkeri, female

Prionyx parkeri, female, head
© Eric R. Eaton · 9
Prionyx parkeri, female, head
Prionyx parkeri, side
© Thom Wilson of Baltimore City, MD, CityEcology@gmail.com · 9
Prionyx parkeri, side

Prionyx parkeri, sphecid wasp
© Copyright John Ascher, 2006-2014 · 6
Prionyx parkeri, sphecid wasp
Prionyx parkeri, sphecid wasp
© Copyright John Ascher, 2006-2014 · 6
Prionyx parkeri, sphecid wasp

Prionyx parkeri, sphecid wasp
© Copyright John Ascher, 2006-2014 · 6
Prionyx parkeri, sphecid wasp
Prionyx parkeri, sphecid wasp
© Copyright John Ascher, 2006-2014 · 6
Prionyx parkeri, sphecid wasp

Prionyx parkeri, side
Native Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab; Photographer: Erika Tucker · 1
Prionyx parkeri, side
Prionyx parkeri, top
Native Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab; Photographer: Erika Tucker · 1
Prionyx parkeri, top

Prionyx parkeri
Native Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab; Photographer: Erika Tucker · 1
Prionyx parkeri
Prionyx parkeri, antennae, male
Bohart, R.M., Menke, A.S. 1963. · 0
Prionyx parkeri, antennae, male

Prionyx parkeri, clypeus, female
Bohart, R.M., Menke, A.S. 1963. · 0
Prionyx parkeri, clypeus, female
Prionyx parkeri, map
Bohart, R.M., Menke, A.S. 1963. · 0
Prionyx parkeri, map
Overview
Taken from: Bohart, R.M., Menke, A.S. 1963. A Reclassification of the Sphecinae: With a Revision of the Nearctic Species of the Tribes Sceliphronini and Sphecini.
Male.—Length 10.5 mm; head and thorax black, gaster red, tergites I and IL black on basal two-thirds, tergites IV—VII and sternite VII black; wings clear in cellular area, darker beyond; erect hair of head and thorax white; face, pronotal lobe and vertex, scutal furrows, scutellum, postscutellum, pleura above mid and hind coxae with weakly developed silver appressed pubescence; flagellum as in figure 102; labial palpus subequal to maxillary palpus; sternite VII with a broad U-shaped emargination; genitalia illustrated in Parker, 1960, figure 11.
Female.—Average length 18 mm; garter all red, or tergites V and VI black; clypeus (fig. 54) with smooth dimpled area preceding notch much larger than median ocellus; prothoracic lobe nearly always with posterior one-half or more silvery; scutellum and postscutellum usually with conspicuous silvery pubescence; labial palpus about as long as maxillary palpus (compare figs. 96, 97, and see Parker, 1960, figs. 7, 8).

Kinds
Types.—Holotype ♂: Mill Potrero (north side Mt. Pinos) Kern Co., California, July 6, 1959 (F. D. Parker, UCD); 65 ♂ and 51 ♀ paratypes collected by P.. C. Bechtel, 11. M. Bohart, P.. W. Bushing, D. Q. Cavagnaro, J. C. Downey, A. A. Grigarick, W. G. Iltis, M. E. Irwin, P. lvi. Marsh, A. S. Menke, D. P.. Miller, C. G. Moore, W. P. McClellan, L. P.. Nault, P. P. Paige, F. D. Parker, E. I. Sch linger, 11. W. Spore, V. L. Vesterby and P.. K. Washino (UCD), from April 18 through October 23, in 1950—1961, at the following localities. CALFORNIA: Mill Potrero, Kern Co.; 3 mi. W. Cachuma Lake, Santa Ynez Mts., Santa Barbara Co.; Davis, Yolo Co.

Names
Scientific source:

Prionyx parkeri Bohart and Menke, new species (Figs. 35, 54, 96, 102) Priononyx pubidorsum of authors, not Costa. Priononyx bifoveolata of authors, not Taschenberg.


Geographic distribution
Distribution.—This species is found throughout the United States and southward to the Isthmus of Tehuantepec (fig. 35).

Natural history
Kohl (1890) and Fernald (1906) considered this species to be Taschenberg’s bifoveolata, described from Brazil. Later, Fernald (1931) synonymized bifoveolata under Costa’s earlier name pubidorsum, after examination of the types of both species. However, Bohart has seen Costa’s type and verified that it is synonymous with thomae (Fabricius). Although we have not seen the type of bifoveolata it is very doubtful that Taschenberg’s species is conspecific with parkeri. We have not seen any examples of parkeri from South America in the many collections we have examined, and apparently the only material that Kohl and Fernald saw from South America was the type of bifoveolata collected at “Nov. Friburgo,” Brazil. The common South American species Prionyx striatulus (Brethes) is very similar to parkeri except that the seventh sternite is entire in striatulus, and therefore, it is very probable that Brethes’ species is synonymous with Taschenberg’s bifoveolatus. The director of the museum in Halle recently tried to locate the type of bifoveolata, but it could not be found even though Kohl and Fernald studied it there. Prionyx canadensis is very close to parkeri but the male antenna is diagnostic (compare figs. 100, 102). For many years, the females of parkeri and thomae were considered to be indistinguishable. Then, Bohart (1958) separated the two on the basis of the larger dimpled area preceding the clypeal notch in the former. Finally Parker (1960) discovered that the very short labial palpus of thomae offered an easy means of distinction. Specimens of parkeri from the eastern United States, especially Florida, have darker wings, and frequently the tergites are mostly dark. In addition, these specimens may have the appressed thoracic pubescence greatly reduced. In such specimens, the male antenna and genitalia must be relied upon to distinguish the species from canadensis. Biology.—Evans (1958) listed the known prey as Melanoplus scudderi Uhler, M. femurrubrum propinquus Scudder, Trimeroptropis citrina Scudder, and Sciretetica marmorata picta (Scudder). Sleeping aggregations of males of this wasp (identified as pubidorsum) have been detailed by Linsley (1962).

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Updated: 2017-12-17 21:50:09 gmt
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