D I S C O V E R    L I F E   
Bee Hunt! Odonata Lepidoptera 
  HomeAll Living ThingsIDnature guidesGlobal mapperAlbumsLabelsSearch
  AboutNewsEventsResearchEducationProjectsStudy sitesHelp


Dolichovespula norvegicoides (Sladen, 1918)
NORTHERN AERIAL YELLOWJACKET
Life   Insecta   Hymenoptera   Vespoidea   Vespidae   Dolichovespula

Dolichovespula norvegicoides, face
© altered from Miller 1961by Grace Chen · 1
Dolichovespula norvegicoides, face

Click on map for details about points.

Links
80x5 - 240x3 - 240x4 - 320x1 - 320x2 - 320x3 - 640x1 - 640x2
Set display option above.
Click on images to enlarge.
Dolichovespula norvegicoides, queen abdomen
© altered from Miller 1961by Grace Chen · 1
Dolichovespula norvegicoides, queen abdomen
Dolichovespula norvegicoides, male abdomen1
© altered from Miller 1961by Grace Chen · 1
Dolichovespula norvegicoides, male abdomen1

Dolichovespula norvegicoides, worker abdomen
© altered from Miller 1961by Grace Chen · 1
Dolichovespula norvegicoides, worker abdomen
Dolichovespula norvegicoides, distribution
© from Akre 1981 · 1
Dolichovespula norvegicoides, distribution
Overview
Akre, R.D., A. Greene, J.F. MacDonald, P.J. Landholt, and H.G. Davis. (1981). Yellowjackets of North America, North of Mexico. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. Handbook #552.


Dolichovespula norvegicoides is restricted almost entirely to the Canadian and Hudsonian Zones of the Boreal Region (fig. 41). Most aspects of the biology of this species are incompletely known and data on its behavior are totally lacking. The few recorded nests have been aerial and quite small. One examined in Vermont on August 6 by Bequaert (1931) was in dense bushes about 10 cm off the ground. The colony consisted of 50 workers and the foundress queen—reproductives had not yet emerged; however, Bequaert previously collected males in the Adirondacks as early as July 19. A nest collected in late October at Granite Lake in the Cabinet Wilderness, 10 to 15 miles south of Libby, Mont., was located in a shrub 15 cm above ground. The nest was 12.5 cm in diameter and had two combs with a total of 234 cells. Twenty-three dead workers were in the nest. Worker populations of D. norvegicoides probably seldom approach the size commonly attained by its close relative, D. arenaria. R.E. Wagner (cited by Yamane, 1975) reported the social parasite, D. arctica, is sometimes found in colonies of D. norvegicoides. Since there have been few collections, the incidence of parasitism is unknown.



Reprinted with permission from: Miller, C.D.F. 1961 Taxonomy and Distribution of Nearctic Vespula. The Canadian Entomologist Supplement 22.


Diagnostic Characters
Color.—Black with yellow markings. Structure.—Malar space more than half as long as the penultimate antennal segment (Fig. 2); occipital carina well defined; apical six flagellar segments of male with two tyloides, one near the base and one apically; digitus of male genitalia same as V. albida (Fig. 19). Abdominal Color Patterns.—as in Figs. 60, 63, 65. Facial Color Pattern.—as in Fig. 83.

This Nearctic species is restricted almost entirely to the Canadian and Hudsonian zone of the Boreal region.

Discussion
Miller (1958) demonstrated why this entity deserves specific recognition. It remains distinct throughout its entire range which is partially sympatric with that of V. albida with which it has been associated in a subspecific manner. No intergradient color patterns between the two have ever found and the males are structurally separable. The writer continues to recognize this entity as a good species. Biological Notes.—The nest of this species is reported as being aerial.

Supported by
go to Discover Life's Facebook group

Following served from Dolichovespula norvegicoides, Tom Murray, http://www.pbase.com/tmurray74
   
Top | See original context

Following served from Dolichovespula norvegicoides, Tom Murray, http://www.pbase.com/tmurray74
   
Top | See original context

Updated: 2019-01-16 10:42:01 gmt
Discover Life | Top
© Designed by The Polistes Corporation