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Dianthidium floridiense Schwarz, 1926
Life   Insecta   Hymenoptera   Apoidea   Megachilidae   Dianthidium
Subgenus: Dianthidium

Dianthidium floridiense, female, top
© Mary Paul · 1
Dianthidium floridiense, female, top

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Dianthidium floridiense, female, side
© Mary Paul · 1
Dianthidium floridiense, female, side
Dianthidium floridiense, female, face
© Mary Paul · 1
Dianthidium floridiense, female, face

Dianthidium floridiense, male, T1
© Kimberly Huntzinger, 2007 · 1
Dianthidium floridiense, male, T1
Dianthidium floridiense, male, T7 b
© Kimberly Huntzinger, 2007 · 1
Dianthidium floridiense, male, T7 b
Overview
FEMALE—Length 9 mm.; black, with ferruginous maculations and entirely ferruginous legs; clypeus, scape and basal segments of flagellum ferruginous, antennae becoming more piceous apically; lateral face marks slightly narrowed above, terminating near top of eye; vertex with a narrow band which is slightly interrupted medially and extends down below upper end of eye; tubercles, tegulae, axillae and entire scutellum ferruginous, the scutum, including median third of anterior margin, black, lateral areas adjacent to tubercles narrowly ferruginous, this extending very narrowly along lateral margins to the axillae; entire pleura and propodeum black; basal abdominal tergum, except for the somewhat darkened apical margin, entirely ferruginous; terga 2-4 with lateral, transverse maculae, which are slightly emarginate on posterior border, widely separated, but becoming broadly ferruginous at extreme sides of tergum 2, tergum 5 with a pair of small, ferruginous blotches that are quite widely separated; face somewhat longer than distance between eyes above; eyes slightly convergent below; lateral ocelli subequally distant from margin of vertex and eyes; vertex and cheeks with a carinate, posterior margin; cheeks very slightly narrower than eyes; clypeus very slightly convex, apical margin entire; mandibles dark, 3-dentate, middle tooth much nearer the apical tooth than to the inner angle; wings quite deeply infuscated, more deeply so in region of marginal cell, veins piceous; tegulae very finely and closely punctate; hind coxae with a short, triangular, spine-like tubercle; spurs pale yellow; pubescence entirely pale, very short and inconspicuous, but somewhat more elongate and copious beneath wings on metapleura and propodeum above; ventral scopa entirely whitish; punctures quite coarse, deep and distinct, close over most of head and thorax, slightly separated across vertex, those on vertex, scutellum and pleura coarser than on other areas; abdominal terga 1-5 shining, punctures well separated, becoming quite close laterally, densely crowded on 6.

MALE—Length 10-11 mm.; black, with yellow maculations on head and ferruginous maculations on thorax and abdomen, legs almost completely ferruginous; clypeus, mandibles in large part, and lateral facial maculations yellow, the lateral maculations narrowed above, terminated near top of eye where they are somewhat infused with red; scape, pedicel and segments 1 and 2 of antennae ferruginous, flagellum otherwise piceous; tubercles, tegulae, axillae and posterior half of scutellum ferruginous, pleura and propodeum entirely black; scutum, including median third of anterior margin, black, this margin otherwise narrowly ferruginous, this band extending very narrowly along lateral margins to axillae; basal abdominal tergum largely ferruginous, tergum 2 ferruginous over basal two- thirds, apical third more blackish, tergum 3 with a pair of elongate, lateral, curved maculations, and tergum 4 with widely separated, small maculae; face somewhat longer than distance between eyes above, eyes very slightly convergent below; lateral ocelli slightly nearer eyes than to margin of vertex; posterior margin of vertex and cheeks distinctly carinate; cheeks considerably narrower than eyes; mandibles distinctly 3-dentate, middle tooth conspicuous, very slightly nearer apical tooth than to inner angle; tegulae very finely and densely punctate; wings deeply infuscated, somewhat violaceous, veins piceous; hind basitarsi somewhat yellowish, legs otherwise pale ferruginous or testaceous, spurs yellowish, hind coxa with a conspicuous, robust, posteriorly directed, bright yellow spine; pubescence entirely pale, very short and inconspicuous, copious only beneath wing bases and upper part of lateral faces of propodeum; punctures coarse, deep and distinct, close over most of head and thorax, slightly separated only on vertex, rather fine on lower cheeks, lower half of face, and on scutum, quite coarse on scutellum and pleura; abdominal terga shining, punctures well separated medially on terga 1-4, somewhat closer on 5, crowded on 6, close but distinct on 7 which is broadly truncate apically, with a median triangular protuberance which is separated from the truncate, lateral margins by rather deep emarginations, the plate largely testaceous, with base and median area blackish; the more basal sterna pale testaceous or ferruginous, sternum with a dense brush of short pubescence occupying median third of apical margin, sternum 5 with much elongate, erect pubescence, largely exposed, with thin, erect, elongate pubescence, 7 and 8 retracted (fig. 5); gonostyli of genital armature very nearly equal to penis valves in length, in contrast with simile (fig. 5).

DISTRIBUTION—Florida, March to November.

FLOWER RECORDS—Bidens and Sabal. Timberlake (1943) believed floridiense to be merely a form of curvatum, but the extreme difference in coloration, with no evident intergradation, the larger size, and the more conspicuous second mandibular tooth of the male convinces this writer that it is distinct.

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FamilyScientific name @ source (records)
Lamiaceae  Clinopodium ashei @ AMNH_BEE (3)

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Following served from Jeff Hollenbeck, BugGuide, bugguide.net
   
Top | See original context

Following served from Jeff Hollenbeck, BugGuide, bugguide.net
   
Top | See original context

Updated: 2018-10-17 21:22:21 gmt
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