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Hylaeus floridanus (Robertson, 1893)
Prosopis floridanus Robertson, 1893; Prosopis eulophi Robertson, 1905; Hylaeus (Paraprosopis) packardi Mitchell, 1951

Life   Insecta   Hymenoptera   Apoidea   Colletidae   Hylaeus
Subgenus: Paraprosopis

Hylaeus floridanus, M, side, Moore Co., N. Carolina ---.. ZS PMax
© Copyright source/photographer · 5
Hylaeus floridanus, M, side, Moore Co., N. Carolina ---.. ZS PMax

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    Male Paratype seen at MCZ.
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Hylaeus floridanus, F, back, Moore Co., N. Carolina ---.. ZS PMax
© Copyright source/photographer · 5
Hylaeus floridanus, F, back, Moore Co., N. Carolina ---.. ZS PMax
Hylaeus floridanus, F, face, Moore Co., N. Carolina ---.. ZS PMax
© Copyright source/photographer · 5
Hylaeus floridanus, F, face, Moore Co., N. Carolina ---.. ZS PMax

Hylaeus floridanus, F, side, Moore Co., N. Carolina ---.. ZS PMax
© Copyright source/photographer · 5
Hylaeus floridanus, F, side, Moore Co., N. Carolina ---.. ZS PMax
Hylaeus floridanus, M, back, Moore Co., N. Carolina ---.. ZS PMax
© Copyright source/photographer · 5
Hylaeus floridanus, M, back, Moore Co., N. Carolina ---.. ZS PMax

Hylaeus floridanus, M, face, Moore Co., N. Carolina ---.. ZS PMax
© Copyright source/photographer · 5
Hylaeus floridanus, M, face, Moore Co., N. Carolina ---.. ZS PMax
Hylaeus floridanus, M, side, Moore Co., N. Carolina ---.. ZS PMax
© Copyright source/photographer · 5
Hylaeus floridanus, M, side, Moore Co., N. Carolina ---.. ZS PMax

Hylaeus floridanus, figure12a
Mitchell, Bees of the Eastern United States, Vol. I, 1960 · 1
Hylaeus floridanus, figure12a
Hylaeus floridanus, figure14g
Mitchell, Bees of the Eastern United States, Vol. I, 1960 · 1
Hylaeus floridanus, figure14g

Hylaeus floridanus, female, abd top
John B. Pascarella · 1
Hylaeus floridanus, female, abd top
Hylaeus floridanus, female, face2
John B. Pascarella · 1
Hylaeus floridanus, female, face2

Hylaeus floridanus, female, fr tarsi
John B. Pascarella · 1
Hylaeus floridanus, female, fr tarsi
Hylaeus floridanus, female, propodeum
John B. Pascarella · 1
Hylaeus floridanus, female, propodeum

Hylaeus floridanus, female, rear tarsi
John B. Pascarella · 1
Hylaeus floridanus, female, rear tarsi
Hylaeus floridanus, female, scutm
John B. Pascarella · 1
Hylaeus floridanus, female, scutm
Overview
Reprinted with permission from: Mitchell, T.B. 1960 Bees of the Eastern United States. North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station Technical Bulletin No. 141.


FEMALE—Length 4.5 mm.; black; antennae fuscous above, ferruginous beneath; face marks yellow, subtriangular, entirely filling space between clypeus, eyes and antennae, extending rather broadly along eye margin to a rounded apex at about half the distance from antennae to top of eye; clypeus with a small, median, subapical, yellow spot; transverse maculae on collar, tubercles and small anterior spot on tegulae, yellow; wings subhyaline, veins and stigma ferruginous; basal half of front and hind tibiae and basal third of mid tibiae yellow; all spurs and basal half of hind basitarsi pale yellow, legs otherwise dark; face narrowed below; cheeks considerably narrower than eyes in lateral view; foveae finely linear, separated from eye by a slightly wider space, widely divergent from eye above, ending about midway between eyes and lateral ocelli; 2nd segment of flagellum about half as long as broad, 1st segment only slightly broader than long, 3rd and following segments with these dimensions subequal; front coxae simple; dorsal face of propodeum slightly longer than metanotum, posterior face sharply truncate, subcarinate laterally, very finely rugose, lateral faces more shining, obscurely punctate; metanotum densely tessellate or subrugose; clypeus finely tessellate, with numerous shallow obscure punctures; face above antennae closely and deeply punctate, subrugose medially; scutum deeply, distinctly and quite closely punctate, punctures on scutellum not so close, punctures of pleura well separated, slightly larger than those on scutum; abdomen rather shiny, distinctly and closely but very minutely punctate, even on basal segment.

MALE—Length 4 mm.; black; antennae brownish-ferruginous, the scape black; tegulae brownish, with a small, yellowish, anterior spot; wings subhyaline, veins brownish; mandibles and labrum black; maculations cream- colored, as follows: clypeus, supraclypeal area and lateral portion of face extending along inner orbits above antennae and rounded above, two narrow lines on collar, tubercles, anterior face of front tibiae and basitarsi, basal third and apical spot on mid tibiae, basal half and apex of hind tibiae, mid and hind tarsi, with apical joints reddened, and spurs; eyes convergent below; cheeks about half width of eyes in lateral view; punctures of scutum deep and distinct, close but not crowded anteriorly, slightly more sparse posteriorly, as also on pleura; very fine but distinct and well separated on abdomen basally, becoming closer and obscure apically.

DISTRIBUTION—Specimens of floridanus have been seen from the following Bastern states: Minnesota, Michigan, Illinois, Kentucky, North Carolina, Georgia and Florida. There seem to be two flights in North Carolina; one in the spring, from April to July, and a fall flight in September and October. Although none have been collected in August, it is possible that it is a continuous extended flight or a succession of overlapping generations throughout the season.

FLOWER RECORDS — Spring host plants are Erigeron quercifolius, Ilex, Polygonella polygama and Pyracantha, while in the fall it visits Aster and Solidago. Robertson (1929) records this species on Cornus paniculata and Eulophus americanus. Metz considered this species a synonym of modestus, and the same error has been carried over into the Catalog of Hymenoptera (Muesebeck, et al. 1951. p. 1051).


Reprinted from: Snelling, R. 1970. STUDIES ON NORTH AMERICAN BEES OF THE GENUS HYLAEUS. 5. THE SUBGENERA HYLAEUS. S. STR. AND PARAPROSOPIS (HYMENOPTERA: COLLETIDAE) Contributions in Science, No. 180.

I have examined the paratype of H. packardi and find that, aside from the immaculate pronotal collar and tegulae, it does not differ sufficiently from H. floridanus to justify specific status. Since such maculations are highly variable within this subgenus I do not feel that this form can be considered a subspecies either. While I have seen no other specimens with the immaculate pronotal collar, I have seen some with the tegular spot absent; it is commonly greatly reduced.

This species is so far known from the eastern United States, from Maine to Florida. A westward extension occurs along the Great Lakes as far as Minnesota.


Identification
Reprinted with permission from: Mitchell, T.B. 1960 Bees of the Eastern United States. North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station Technical Bulletin No. 141.

Synonamous name : Hylaeus packardi

MALE—Length 4 mm.; black; antennae brownish-ferruginous, paler beneath, scape piceous; tegulae piceous; wings subhyaline, veins brownish; mandibles and lab rum black; maculations cream-colored as follows: clypeus, supraclypeal area, lateral portions of face extending along inner orbits and ending acutely on eye margin above antennae, small spot on tubercles, entire front tibiae except a slight amount of ferruginous posteriorly, basal fourth and apical rim on mid and hind tibiae, all tarsi except the reddened more apical segments; collar and tegulae entirely dark; eyes convergent below; cheeks slightly more than half the width of eyes in lateral view; thoracic punctures deep and distinct, close but not contiguous on scutum and scutellum, slightly more coarse on pleura, interspaces dull and tessellate; abdomen shining at base, punctures minute, well separated, becoming closer but very obscure on the following segments which are less shining.


DISTRIBUTION—The two specimens forming the type series were collected in Maine and New York, the latter specimen in September. No additional specimens have been seen.


Names
Scientific source:

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FamilyScientific name @ source (records)
Asteraceae  Solidago @ AMNH_BEE (3)
Rhamnaceae  Ceanothus sp @ BBSL (1)

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Updated: 2018-09-22 05:53:50 gmt
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