D I S C O V E R    L I F E   
Bee Hunt! Odonata Lepidoptera 
  HomeAll Living ThingsIDnature guidesGlobal mapperAlbumsLabelsSearch
  AboutNewsEventsResearchEducationProjectsStudy sitesHelp


Vespula acadica (Sladen, 1918)
FOREST YELLOWJACKET
Vespa rufa var americana; De buysson; Vespula rufa var sladeni; Bequaert

Life   Insecta   Hymenoptera   Vespoidea   Vespidae   Vespula

Vespula acadica, face
© altered from Miller 1961by Grace Chen · 1
Vespula acadica, face

Click on map for details about points.

Links
80x5 - 240x3 - 240x4 - 320x1 - 320x2 - 320x3 - 640x1 - 640x2
Set display option above.
Click on images to enlarge.
Vespula acadica, queen abdomen
© altered from Miller 1961by Grace Chen · 1
Vespula acadica, queen abdomen
Vespula acadica, female abdomen
© altered from Miller 1961by Grace Chen · 1
Vespula acadica, female abdomen

Vespula acadica, male abdomen
© altered from Miller 1961by Grace Chen · 1
Vespula acadica, male abdomen
Vespula acadica, distribution
© from Akre 1981 · 1
Vespula acadica, distribution

Vespula acadica, distribution
© Miller 1961 · 1
Vespula acadica, distribution
Overview
Akre, R.D., A. Greene, J.F. MacDonald, P.J. Landholt, and H.G. Davis. (1981). Yellowjackets of North America, North of Mexico. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. Handbook #552.

Vespula acadica (forest yellowjacket) is restricted almost entirely to the Canadian Zone. (fig. 42). V. acadica was reported as an aerial nester by Sladen (1918); however, two of three nests found by MacDonald et al. (1975a) were subterranean, and one was in a decaying log on the forest floor. From 1975 to 1977, eight additional nests were collected—six in forested areas near La Grande, Oreg., and two in northern Idaho near Harrison (Roush and Akre, 1978). Four of these nests were in decaying logs, two were under logs, and the other two were subterranean, one in duff (partly decayed vegetable matter such as leaves and pine needles) and one in the soil (fig. 43). Entrance tunnels varied from 7 to 40 cm, usually 15 to 25 cm. The deepest subterranean nest was 15 cm under the soil surface. Nests were comprised of one worker-producing comb and one to three reproductive-producing combs. The largest mature colony consisted of 425 workers, 70 males, and 78 queens. The nest had four combs with a total of 1,791 cells. The seasonal cycle and size of the colonies were comparable to V. atropilosa colonies collected during the same year on comparable dates. V. acadica workers prey only on live arthropods. They are predators on caterpillars, flies, and hemipterans. Other prey preferences are unknown. No study of nest associates has been made, but five of the eight nests collected had 2 to 20 cells containing Sphecophaga cocoons, probably S. vesparum burra. A few nests had eggs of Fannia spp. on the outside envelope. Being primarily a forest species, this yellow- jacket has little contact with man; however, when colonies are disturbed, workers of this yellowjacket may be quite aggressive and persistent and sting repeatedly.


Reprinted with permission from: Miller, C.D.F. 1961 Taxonomy and Distribution of Nearctic Vespula. The Canadian Entomologist Supplement 22.


Diagnostic Characters
Color.—Black with yellow markings. Structure.—Malar space less than half as long as the penultimate antennal segment (Fig. 1); occipital carina incomplete (not reaching base of mandible), (Fig. 4); abdominal tergites extensively covered with long erect hairs; digitus of male genitalia nearly half as long as distal, saddle-shaped portion of aedeagus (Fig. 15). Abdominal Color Patterns.—as in Figs. 33, 36, 39. Facial Color Pattern.—as in Fig. 73.

This Nearctic species is restricted almost entirely to the Canadian zone.

Discussion

Miller (1958) demonstrated why this entity deserves specific recognition. In order to accept Bequaert’s (1931) treatment of this entity as two varieties of Vespula rufa (Linné) or Bohart’s (1951), in Muesebeck, treatment of it as a subspecies of V. rufa or his (1957) treatment of it as a synonym of Vespula atropilosa (Sladen) and Vespula vidua (Sauss.), one would have to ignore three important s about it. They would have to ignore, 1) that it has a transcontinental distribution, Map 4, 2) the structural difference Miller (1958) found between it and V. vidua and 3) that it maintains its identity even though its distribution is wholly or partially sympatric with other closely related forms such as V. atropilosa, V. vidua, V. consobrina and V. intermedia. Ecological Notes.—The nest of this species is recorded by Sladen (1918) as being aerial.

Supported by
go to Discover Life's Facebook group

Following served from Vespula acadica, Tom Murray, http://www.pbase.com/tmurray74
   
Top | See original context

Following served from Vespula acadica, Tom Murray, http://www.pbase.com/tmurray74
   
Top | See original context

Updated: 2018-11-17 15:18:54 gmt
Discover Life | Top
© Designed by The Polistes Corporation